Chronology

The following is a detailed chronology of Ulysses S. Grant's life, from birth to death. Click on a decade below to navigate Grant's activity by year, or view the full timeline.

1820s Birth & Childhood

April 27

Birth of a son, later named Hiram Ulysses Grant, to tanner Jesse Root Grant (Jan. 23, 1794-June 29, 1873) and Hannah Simpson Grant (November 23, 1798-May 11, 1883) at Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio.

Autumn

The Grant family moved to Georgetown, Brown County, Ohio.


1830s Schooling

Autumn

Ulysses S. Grant began attending the Maysville Seminary at Maysville, KY.

Spring

Grant left Maysville Seminary.

March 22

Ulysses S. Grant appointed to USMA, West Point, N.Y.

May 29

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at West Point.


1840s Marriage & Military Service

June

Ulysses S. Grant graduated from USMA.

September 30

Bvt. 2nd Lt. Ulysses S. Grant reported for duty to Jefferson Barracks near St. Louis, Mo.

May

Ulysses S. Grant proposed marriage to Julia Dent.

June 3

Ulysses S. Grant reported at Camp Salubrity near Natchitoches, La.

August

The 4th Inf. sailed from New Orleans to Corpus Christi, Tex.

September 30

Ulysses S. Grant promoted to 2nd lt.

April 24

A Mexican declaration of war followed the march of Gen. Zachary Taylor's army (including Ulysses S. Grant) across disputed territory.

May 8

Battle of Palo Alto, now located in Tex.

May 9

Battle of Resaca de la Palma, now located in Tex.

May 18

Occupation of Matamoros, Mexico.

September 24

Surrender of Monterey negotiated.

March 27

Surrender of Vera Cruz negotiated.

April 18

Battle of Cerro Gordo.

September 8

Battle of Molino del Rey.

September 13

Storming of Chapultepec, battles at San Cosme and Belen Garitas, leading to capture of Mexico City.

September 16

Ulysses S. Grant promoted to 1st It. Brevet rank as 1st It. And capt. dated from Sept. 8 and Sept. 13.

May 30

Completion of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which ended the Mexican War.

July 23

Ulysses S. Grant landed at Pascagoula, Miss.

August 22

Marriage of Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Dent in St. Louis.

November 17

Ulysses S. Grant reported at Detroit, and was reassigned to duty at Madison Barracks, Sackets Harbor, N.Y.

April 18

Ulysses S. Grant reported at Detroit after transfer from Sackets Harbor.


1850s Children & Resignation from the Army

May 30

Birth of Frederick Dent Grant, the Grants' first child.

June 12

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Sackets Harbor following transfer from Detroit

July 5

Departure from New York of Ulysses S. Grant and the 4th Inf. bound for the Pacific Coast.

July 22

Birth of Ulysses S. Grant, Jr., the Grants' second child.

September 20

Arrival of Ulysses S. Grant at Columbia Barracks (later Fort Vancouver), Oregon (later Washington) Territory.

August 5

Ulysses S. Grant promoted to Capt.

January 5

Ulysses S. Grant reported for duty at Fort Humboldt, Calif.

April 11

Ulysses S. Grant wrote his resignation from the army.

Summer

Ulysses S. Grant rejoined his family at White Haven, outside St. Louis, Mo.

Summer

Ulysses S. Grant moved from White Haven to Wish-ton-wish, the farm of Lewis Dent on the Dent estate.

July 4

Birth of Ellen Grant, the Grants' third child.

Summer

Ulysses S. Grant moved from Wish-ton-wish to Hardscrabble, the home he built on part of the Dent estate given to his wife by her father.

February 6

Birth of Jesse Root Grant, Jr., fourth and last of the Grant children.


1860s War & Politics

Spring

Ulysses S. Grant moved to Galena, Ill., and began work in his father's leather goods store.

April 12

Fort Sumter attacked.

April 15

President Abraham Lincoln called for 75,000 vols.

April 16

After a patriotic rally in Galena, Ill., Ulysses S. Grant decided to leave his father's leather goods store and to offer his services for the war.

April 18

Ulysses S. Grant presided over a Galena rally held to recruit vols.

April 25

Ulysses S. Grant accompanied the Jo Daviess Guards as they left Galena for Springfield, Ill.

April 27

Ulysses S. Grant's thirty-ninth birthday.

April 29

Ulysses S. Grant began to serve as aide to Governor Richard Yates.

May 4

Ulysses S. Grant became commanding officer at Camp Yates, Springfield.

May 8

Ulysses S. Grant ordered to muster regts. into state service at Mattoon, Belleville, and Anna, Ill.

May 9

Ulysses S. Grant in Mattoon found the 7th Congressional District Regt. not yet ready for muster.

May 10

Ulysses S. Grant witnessed disorders in St. Louis following the Federal capture of Camp Jackson.

May 11

Ulysses S. Grant mustered into state service the 8th Congressional District Regt. at Belleville.

May 15

Ulysses S. Grant mustered into state service the 7th Congressional District Regt. at Mattoon.

May 20

Ulysses S. Grant mustered into state service the 9th Congressional District Regt. at Anna.

May 24

Back in Galena, Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Washington for a commission.

May 30

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Springfield.

June 9

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Covington, Ky., to visit his parents, also, planning to ask Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan in Cincinnati for a military appointment.

June 16

While visiting Col. Joseph J. Reynolds in La Fayette, Ind., on his way back to Springfield, Ulysses S. Grant learned of his appointment as Col. of the 7th Congressional District Regt.

June 18

Ulysses S. Grant formally took command of his regt. at Camp Yates.

June 21

Ulysses S. Grant left Camp Yates for a visit to Galena.

June 24

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Springfield.

June 28

The 7th Congressional District Regt. mustered into U.S. service as the 2lst Ill.

July 3

The 21st Ill began a march to Quincy, Ill.

July 5

The 21st Ill camped at Allinson's Grove, about seven miles west of Jacksonville, Ill.

July 8

The 21st Ill ordered to await transportation on the Illinois River to St. Louis.

July 10

The 21st Ill ordered to proceed to Quincy by railroad due to guerrilla action in north Mo.

July 11

The 21 st Ill arrived at Quincy and camped at West Quincy, Mo.

July 12

The 21st Ill stationed along the Quincy and Palmyra Railroad in Mo.

July 15

The 21st Ill advanced to Salt River Bridge on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad.

July 17

The 21st Ill marched to Florida, Mo., in a fruitless search for rebels commanded by Brig. Gen. Thomas Harris, Mo. State Guard.

July 19

The 21st Ill arrived at Macon City, Mo.

July 20

The 21st Ill traveled by railroad to Mexico, Mo.

July 21

U.S. advance in Va. halted by defeat at the first battle of Bull Run or Manassas.

July 24

Ulysses S. Grant assigned command of all troops stationed near Mexico by Brig. Gen. John Pope, commanding District of North Mo.

July 25

Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont assumed command of the Western Dept.

July 31

Ulysses S. Grant nominated by Lincoln as brig. gen. The Senate confirmed the appointment on Aug. 5.

August 5

Ulysses S. Grant sent by Pope to St. Louis to confer with Fremont.

August 7

Ulysses S. Grant asked John A. Rawlins of Galena to serve on his staff.

August 8

Ulysses S. Grant assumed command of Ironton, Mo., which was threatened by C.S.A. Brig. Gen. William J. Hardee.

August 10

U.S. defeat at the battle of Wilson's Creek, Oak Hills, or Springfield, Mo., roused apprehension of the loss of the state.

Skirmish at Potosi, Mo., near Ironton.

August 17

Superseded by Brig. Gen. Benjamin M. Prentiss, Ulysses S. Grant left Ironton for St. Louis.

August 19

Ulysses S. Grant assigned to command at Jefferson City, Mo.

August 28

Called from Jefferson City to St. Louis, Ulysses S. Grant ordered to coordinate a movement against Brig. Gen. M. Jeff Thompson, Mo. State Guard, from hd. qrs. at Cape Girardeau, Mo.

August 30

Ulysses S. Grant assumed command at Cape Girardeau.

September 1

Ulysses S. Grant assumed command of the District of Southeast Mo.

September 2

Due to the refusal of Prentiss to serve under Ulysses S. Grant, the expedition against Thompson collapsed, and Ulysses S. Grant went to Cairo, Ill, formally assuming command there on September 4.

September 3

Forces under C.S. A. Brig. Gen. Gideon Pillow entered Ky. to occupy Hickman and Columbus, violating the self-proclaimed neutrality of the state.

September 4

Confederate troops occupied Columbus.

September 6

Ulysses S. Grant occupied Paducah, Ky. Fremont assigned Brig. Gen. Charles F. Smith to command at Paducah.

September 7

Ulysses S. Grant in Cape Girardeau arranged reinforcements for Paducah, then returned to Cairo.

September 8

A gunboat reconnaissance engaged batteries at Lucas Bend, Mo., a few miles north of Columbus.

September 10

Ulysses S. Grant directed a reconnaissance from Norfolk toward Belmont, Mo., supported by gunboats. After a skirmish at Beckwith Farm, U.S. troops returned to Norfolk, but advanced to another skirmish the next day.

September 13

Ulysses S. Grant advanced his troops from Fort Holt, Ky., opposite Cairo, to Fort Jefferson, five miles farther down the Mississippi River.

Death of Samuel Simpson Grant, brother of Ulysses S. Grant.

September 15

Ulysses S. Grant ordered to send two regts. to Washington.

September 17

Ulysses S. Grant temporarily withdrew his troops from Fort Jefferson to Fort Holt.

September 20

The siege of Lexington, Mo., begun on September 12 by Maj. Gen. Sterling Price, Mo. State Guard, ended in U.S. surrender.

Ulysses S. Grant visited Cape Girardeau to inspect property taken for fortifications.

September 21

Ulysses S. Grant directed a reconnaissance along the Ky. shore of the Mississippi River which encountered no Confederates closer than Columbus.

September 22

Skirmish near Fort Jefferson.

September 24

Under pressure from C.S.A. skirmishers in both Mo. and Ky., Ulysses S. Grant again withdrew his troops from Fort Jefferson to Fort Holt.

September 26

Cavalry skirmish at Hunter's Farm below Norfolk.

September 30

Ulysses S. Grant went to Paducah believing, incorrectly, that it was threatened by a Confederate army.

October 1

Ulysses S. Grant withdrew troops from Norfolk, Mo., to Bird's Point, Mo., opposite Cairo, in order to strengthen his defensive position.

October 2

Ulysses S. Grant sent troops to Charleston, Mo., to intercept Brig. Gen. M. Jeff Thompson, Mo. State Guard, who, however, was still at New Madrid, Mo.

October 7

Ulysses S. Grant again sent troops to Charleston, again without encountering Thompson.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the gunboats Tyler and Lexington on reconnaissance down the Mississippi River. The gunboats exchanged fire with C.S.A. batteries a few miles above Columbus, Ky.

October 8

Ulysses S. Grant reviewed troops at Cape Girardeau, Mo.

October 14

Ulysses S. Grant rebuffed an offer by C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Leonidas Polk to exchange prisoners.

U.S. and C.S.A. cav. skirmished about nine miles south of Bird's Point in Mo.

Ulysses S. Grant organized his troops into five brigades, commanded by Brig. Gen. John A. McClernand (Cairo), Col. Richard J. Oglesby (Bird's Point), Col. William H. L. Wallace (Bird's Point), Col. John Cook (Fort Holt, Ky.), and Col. Joseph B. Plummer (Cape Girardeau).

October 16

Ulysses S. Grant sent troops from Cape Girardeau toward Farmington, Mo., to cut off Thompson's army, which was threatening Ironton, Mo.

October 18

Ulysses S. Grant ordered a reconnaissance by the gunboat Tyler toward Columbus.

October 21

The detachment of Ulysses S. Grant's troops from Cape Girardeau, under Plummer, defeated Thompson at Fredericktown, Mo.

U.S. troops defeated at Ball's Bluff or Leesburg, Va.

Ulysses S. Grant left Cairo for St. Louis.

October 23

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Springfield, Ill., to see Governor Richard Yates about obtaining arms and art. for his command.

October 24

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Cairo, considering his visit to Springfield "only partially successful."

In Washington, D.C., orders were prepared for the removal of Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont from command of the Western Dept. These orders were not delivered for nine days.

October 31

Ulysses S. Grant appeared before a U.S. House of Representatives investigating committee at Cairo to discuss arms of his troops.

November 1

Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan replaced Bvt. Lt. Gen.Winfield Scott as general-in-chief.

Ulysses S. Grant was ordered to demonstrate southward along both banks of the Mississippi River.

November 2

Ulysses S. Grant was ordered to send an expedition to the St. Francis River in Mo. to intercept Thompson.

Fremont relieved by Maj. Gen. David Hunter, who took command of the Western Dept. on the following day.

November 4

Ulysses S. Grant ordered one regt. from Cape Girardeau to Bloomfield, Mo.

November 5

Ulysses S. Grant planned demonstrations against Columbus and Belmont,Mo., using troops from Paducah, Ky., as well as his own.

November 6

Ulysses S. Grant ordered one regt. to advance from Bird's Point to Charleston, and nearly two regts. to advance from Fort Holt toward Columbus.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered his commander at Bloomfield to communicate with him at Belmont.

Ulysses S. Grant embarked from Cairo with about 3,000 men and anchored about twelve miles above Belmont.

November 7

Ulysses S. Grant landed near Belmont, encountered some 2,500 C.S.A. troops. After U.S. forces destroyed the enemy camp, reinforcements from Columbus drove them back to their transports in some disorder. The expedition then returned to Cairo.

U.S. forces captured Port Royal, S. Car.

November 8

Ulysses S. Grant congratulated his troops on their gallantry at Belmont.

Ulysses S. Grant sent a flag of truce party to gather the dead and wounded on the battlefield of Belmont.

Ulysses S. Grant recalled his Bloomfield expedition to Bird's Point.

November 9

Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck assigned to command the Dept. of the Mo., a command embracing most of the former Western Dept.

November 13

Ulysses S. Grant met Polk on board a flag of truce steamboat to discuss an exchange of prisoners.

November 15

Brig. Gen. Don Carlos Buell assumed command of the Dept. of the Ohio, which included all of Ky. east of the Cumberland River.

November 16

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Thompson to initiate an exchange of prisoners.

November 18

Thompson captured the steamboat Platte Valley at Price's Landing, Mo., possibly in an attempt to capture Ulysses S. Grant.

November 19

Ulysses S. Grant went to Price's Landing in search of Thompson, but learned that he had left the previous evening.

While Ulysses S. Grant was away, McClernand ordered a cav. Reconnaissance in Ky. toward Columbus.

Halleck, who had arrived at St. Louis the previous day, assumedcommand of the Dept. of the Mo.

November 20

Ulysses S. Grant asked Halleck for permission to visit St. Louis to discuss the needs and condition of his command. Halleck denied permission on the following day.

November 22

Ulysses S. Grant sent McClernand to Springfield to arrange to fill and equip regts., then at Cairo.

Ulysses S. Grant directed a gunboat reconnaissance down the Mississippi River to Lucas Bend, Mo.

November 23

Ulysses S. Grant left for Cape Girardeau, returning by November 25.

Julia Dent Grant left Cairo for a visit to St. Louis.

November 28

The St. Louis, first of the ironclad gunboats, arrived at Cairo.

December 1

C.S.A. gunboats on reconnaissance upriver fired a few shots at Fort Holt.

December 5

Ulysses S. Grant visited Columbus on board a flag of truce steamboat. He returned the following day to receive Col. Henry Dougherty, 22nd Ill, wounded at Belmont.

December 6

Ulysses S. Grant ordered a cav. expedition to Belmont to spike some art. reported there. The expedition found nothing.

December 8

Ulysses S. Grant cancelled a proposed expedition to New Madrid, Mo., after learning that the gunboats would be unable to participate.

December 9

Julia Dent Grant left Cairo to visit her father in St. Louis.

December 11

U.S. and C.S.A. cav. skirmished at Bertrand, Mo.

December 13

Ulysses S. Grant prepared his command for an anticipated attack on Bird's Point or Fort Holt. No attack was made.

December 15

Ulysses S. Grant sent his aid-de-camp, Capt. William S. Hillyer, to Chicago to investigate charges of fraud in lumber contracts for Cairo. Hillyer returned a week later with corroboration of the charges.

December 20

Through orders establishing the District of Cairo, Halleck enlarged Ulysses S. Grant's command to include Paducah.

December 23

In orders announcing the District of Cairo, Ulysses S. Grant also assigned Brig. Gen. Eleazer A. Paine, transferred from Paducah, to command at Bird's Point.

December 24

Polk decided to send troops from western Ky. to central Ky. This move, discovered by U.S. forces three days later, eventually brought orders from Washington to maintain U.S. pressure in western Ky.

December 26

Ulysses S. Grant left for an inspection trip up the Ohio River at least as far as Shawneetown, Ill.

December 28

Ulysses S. Grant ordered assessments on C.S.A. sympathizers to support Union refugees in his district.

December 29

Thompson seized Commerce, Mo., and shelled the steamboat City of Alton.

January 2

In response to numerous reports of contract irregularities, Ulysses S. Grant placed a new q.m. on duty at Cairo.

January 7

Ulysses S. Grant sent three gunboats and a squadron of cav. on reconnaissance toward Belmont.

January 8

Ulysses S. Grant received orders from Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck to prepare a reconnaissance into Ky.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Brig. Gen. John A. McClernand at Cairo, Ill., Brig. Gen. Eleazer A. Paine at Bird's Point, Mo., and Col. John Cook at Fort Holt, Ky., to advance to Fort Jefferson, Ky., on the following day. Ulysses S. Grant also ordered Brig. Gen. Charles F. Smith at Paducah, Ky., to advance on Mayfield, Ky., starting Jan. 10.

January 9

Dense fog and a stranded steamboat delayed the start of Ulysses S. Grant's reconnaissance.

January 10

Ulysses S. Grant's forces occupied Fort Jefferson.

January 11

After four of his pickets were shot near Bird's Point, Ulysses S. Grant ordered all citizens within six miles of the post put under guard at Bird's Point.

Three C.S.A. gunboats reconnoitering close to Fort Jefferson were chased back to Columbus, Ky., by two U.S. gunboats.

January 12

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the arrest of his former q.m., Capt. Reuben B. Hatch, who was suspected of fraud.

January 13

Ulysses S. Grant's forces reconnoitered within three miles of Columbus.

January 14

On board a gunboat, Ulysses S. Grant reconnoitered close to Columbus.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the arrest of Capt. William J. Kountz, in charge of water transportation at Cairo, for disobeying orders.

Ulysses S. Grant's forces advanced from Fort Jefferson to Blandville, Ky.

January 15

Ulysses S. Grant joined his forces in Ky.

January 18

Ulysses S. Grant ordered his forces in Ky. to return to Cairo and vicinity. All were back on Jan. 21.

January 19

U.S. victory at Logan's Cross-Roads, near Mill Springs, Ky., cracked the C.S.A. defense line.

January 22

Smith reported to Ulysses S. Grant that his reconnaissance convinced him that two gunboats could capture Fort Henry, Term.

January 23

Ulysses S. Grant left Cairo for St. Louis to ask Halleck for permission for a Tennessee River campaign.

January 28

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Cairo and telegraphed to Halleck for permission to attack Fort Henry.

January 30

Halleck gave Ulysses S. Grant permission to attack Fort Henry.

February 2

Ulysses S. Grant's expedition left Cairo.

February 4

Ulysses S. Grant's advance forces landed near Fort Henry.

On board the gunboat Essex, Ulysses S. Grant steamed within a mile of Fort Henry "to ascertain the range of the rebel guns."

February 5

Ulysses S. Grant brought additional troops from Paducah to near Fort Henry.

February 6

C.S.A. Brig. Gen. Lloyd Tilghman, at nearly evacuated Fort Henry, surrendered to Flag Officer Andrew H. Foote before Ulysses S. Grant's troops arrived.

Ulysses S. Grant occupied Fort Henry and prepared to advance to Fort Donelson, Term.

February 7

Ulysses S. Grant sent a gunboat to destroy a railroad bridge eleven miles upriver from Fort Henry. Ulysses S. Grant inspected the site on the following day.

Ulysses S. Grant's cav. reconnoitered within a mile of Fort Donelson.

February 8

A U.S. gunboat fleet on the Tennessee River reached Florence, Ala.

February 9

Ulysses S. Grant accompanied a cav. reconnaissance toward Fort Donelson.

C.S.A. Brig. Gen. Gideon J. Pillow assumed command of Fort Donelson.

February 10

Ulysses S. Grant held a council of war which reached the unanimous decision to move on Fort Donelson at once.

February 12

Ulysses S. Grant marched most of his army from Fort Henry to begin the siege of Fort Donelson.

February 13

C.S.A. Brig. Gen. John Floyd assumed command at Fort Donelson.

Ulysses S. Grant began to attack Fort Donelson.

February 14

Five U.S. gunboats arrived to join the attack on Fort Donelson.

Ulysses S. Grant was assigned command of the District of West Tenn. Brig. Gen. William T. Sherman replaced Ulysses S. Grant in command of the District of Cairo.

U.S. gunboats attacked Fort Donelson unsuccessfully.

February 15

While Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Foote, C.S.A. forces attacked the U.S. right at Fort Donelson with some success, but then retired. Ulysses S. Grant launched a counterattack on the left which convinced C.S.A. commanders that their position was hopeless.

February 16

In the early morning hours Floyd relinquished command of Fort Donelson to Pillow, who passed it on to Brig. Gen. Simon B. Buckner. As Floyd and Pillow fled, Buckner asked Ulysses S. Grant for "terms of capitulation." Ulysses S. Grant demanded and received the "unconditional and immediate surrender" of Fort Donelson.

February 19

Clarksville, Tenn., surrendered to two U.S. gunboats.

Ulysses S. Grant was promoted to maj. gen. to rank from Feb. 16.

February 20

Ulysses S. Grant visited Clarksville.

February 23

Ulysses S. Grant again visited Clarksville, returning to Fort Donelson the following day.

February 24

Brig. Gen. William Nelson with a division of troops arrived at Clarksville by boat. Ulysses S. Grant immediately sent him on to Nashville, Tenn.

February 25

Nashville was occupied by U.S. forces.

February 27

Ulysses S. Grant spent the day at Nashville, returning to Fort Donelson the following morning.

March 1

Halleck ordered Ulysses S. Grant to advance on the Tennessee River to destroy a railroad bridge near Eastport, Miss., and railroad connections at Corinth, Miss., Jackson and Humboldt, Tenn.

March 2

C.S.A. forces evacuated Columbus.

March 3

President Abraham Lincoln nominated McClernand, Smith, and Lewis Wallace as maj. gens.; John Cook, Richard J. Oglesby, William H. L. Wallace, John McArthur, Jacob G. Lauman, and John A. Logan as brig. Gens. The appointments were confirmed on March 21.

Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan responded to Halleck's complaints against Ulysses S. Grant by authorizing his arrest.

March 4

Halleck ordered Ulysses S. Grant to remain at Fort Henry and to place Smith in charge of the Tennessee River advance. He accused Ulysses S. Grant of disobeying orders by failing to report regularly.

March 5

C.S.A. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard assumed command of the Army of the Miss.

March 6-8

U.S. forces won a victory at the battle of Pea Ridge or Elkhorn Tavern, Ark.

March 7

Ulysses S. Grant asked Halleck to be relieved from further duty in his dept.

March 9

Ulysses S. Grant again asked to be relieved.

The Monitor and Merrimack fought at Hampton Roads, Va.

March 10

Halleck informed Ulysses S. Grant that he could take general direction of the Tennessee River expedition.

March 11

The Dept. of the Miss, was created by merging the Dept. of the Mo. and part of the Dept. of the Ohio. Halleck assumed command on March 13.

McClellan was relieved as general-in-chief while retaining command of the Army of the Potomac.

Smith occupied Savannah, Tenn.

March 12

One battalion of Ulysses S. Grant's cav. skirmished at Paris, Tenn.

Smith sent Brig. Gen. Lewis Wallace's division to Crump's Landing, Tenn.

March 13

For the third time Ulysses S. Grant asked to be relieved.

Halleck asked Ulysses S. Grant to resume command.

March 14

Ulysses S. Grant agreed to resume command.

New Madrid, Mo., fell to U.S. forces.

March 15

Sherman's division occupied Pittsburg Landing, Tenn.

March 17

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Savannah and began to move his troops forward to Pittsburg Landing.

March 19

Ulysses S. Grant inspected encampments at Crump's Landing and Pittsburg Landing.

March 21

Ulysses S. Grant inspected the encampment at Pittsburg Landing.

March 29

C.S.A. armies of Ky. and Miss, were consolidated as Army of the Miss, with Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston in command, Beauregard second in command.

March 31

Hd. qrs. of the District of West Tenn. were officially transferred from Savannah to Pittsburg Landing, although Ulysses S. Grant remained at Savannah to await the arrival of the Army of the Ohio under Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell.

April 1

Ulysses S. Grant sent a reconnaissance under Brig. Gen. William T. Sherman from Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., to Eastport, Miss., and Chickasaw, Ala., on the Tennessee River to destroy C.S.A. batteries, but the expedition found the sites abandoned.

April 3

Advance elements of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos BuelFs Army of the Ohio neared Savannah, Tenn.

C.S.A. Army of the Miss., under Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, began to advance from Corinth, Miss., to attack Ulysses S. Grant at Pittsburg Landing.

April 4

Pickets skirmished near Pittsburg Landing.

April 5

Despite continued skirmishing at Pittsburg Landing, Ulysses S. Grant remained at Savannah to await the arrival of Buell. Ulysses S. Grant had "scarsely the faintest idea of an attack," but C.S.A. forces were preparing to attack the following day.

Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan established siege lines at Yorktown, Va.

April 6

Johnston, with some 40,000 troops, attacked at Shiloh Church, near Pittsburg Landing. Ulysses S. Grant hurried to the field from Savannah. When Johnston was killed, Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard succeeded to command. By the end of the day, U.S. forces had lost considerable ground and casualties were heavy.

April 7

Aided by reinforcements from the Army of the Ohio under Buell, Ulysses S. Grant drove C.S.A. forces from the field in the concluding day of the battle of Shiloh.

C.S.A. forces at Island No. 10 in the Mississippi River surrendered to Maj. Gen. John Pope.

April 8

A reconnaissance from Pittsburg Landing under Sherman returned after encountering C.S.A. cav.

April 11

Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck assumed command at Pittsburg Landing.

Fort Pulaski, near Savannah, Ga., surrendered to U.S. forces.

April 13

An expedition sent by Ulysses S. Grant destroyed a railroad bridge at Bear Creek in Ala.

April 25

Maj. Gen. Charles F. Smith died.

U.S. forces occupied New Orleans, La.

April 27

Ulysses S. Grant's fortieth birthday.

April 29

Halleck began to advance slowly against Corinth.

April 30

Ulysses S. Grant was assigned as second-in-command to Halleck.

May 3

C.S.A. forces evacuated Yorktown.

May 9

C.S.A. forces evacuated Norfolk, Va.

May 11

Ulysses S. Grant asked Halleck "to be relieved from duty entirely or to have my position so defined that there can be no mistaking it."

May 18

Flag Officer David G. Farragut arrived with his fleet at Vicksburg, Miss.

May 25

C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson defeated Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks at Winchester, Va.

May 30

Evacuating Corinth, C.S.A. troops pulled back to Tupelo, Miss.

May 31-June 1

Battle of Seven Pines near Richmond, Va.

June 3

C.S.A. forces began to evacuate Fort Pillow, Tenn., completing their withdrawal on June 5.

June 6

Following a naval battle, U.S. forces captured Memphis, Tenn.

June 10

Ulysses S. Grant was restored to command of the Army of the Tenn.

June 17

Gen. Braxton Bragg replaced Beauregard in command.

June 21

Ulysses S. Grant left Corinth to establish hd. qrs. at Memphis.

June 23

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Memphis.

June 25

C.S.A. cav. derailed and captured a train near Germantown, Tenn.

Seven Days battles began near Richmond.

June 26

Ulysses S. Grant sent two regts. to reinforce an expedition on the White River in Ark.

June 27

Pope assumed command of the Army of Va.

June 28

Farragut's fleet ran the batteries at Vicksburg.

June 30

C.S.A. forces attacked a U.S. wagon train at Rising Sun, Tenn.

July 1

Under authority from Ulysses S. Grant, publication of the Memphis Avalanche was suspended.

July 3

Ulysses S. Grant issued orders that losses caused by guerrillas would be recouped by levies on rebel sympathizers.

C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Sterling Price assumed command of the Army of the West.

July 10

Ulysses S. Grant issued orders to expel the families of C.S.A. soldiers and officials from Memphis.

July 11

Halleck was appointed gen.-in-chief.

Halleck ordered Ulysses S. Grant to report to Corinth.

July 13

Ulysses S. Grant and his family reached Columbus, Ky.

July 15

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Corinth.

Ulysses S. Grant was ordered to send troops from Memphis to Maj. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis in Ark.

July 16

Ulysses S. Grant was assigned to command the districts of Cairo and Miss., the Army of the Miss., and the Army of the Tenn., as well as the District of West Tenn.

Halleck left Corinth.

July 17

Ulysses S. Grant was ordered to send the division of Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas to Buell.

Second Confiscation Act signed.

July 20

Sherman assumed command at Memphis.

July 22

Bragg decided to move half of his army to Chattanooga, Tenn.

July 25

Ulysses S. Grant banned the payment of gold and silver for cotton. This order was countermanded in Washington.

August 8

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the arrest of the Memphis correspondent of the Chicago Times.

August 9

Battle at Cedar Mountain, Va.

August 12

Buell requested two divisions from Ulysses S. Grant.

August 14

Ulysses S. Grant sent two divisions to Buell.

August 18

Col. Rodney Mason surrendered Clarksville, Tenn., to rebel guerrillas.

Rebel guerrillas captured and burned two steamboats on the Tennessee River.

August 25

Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand was ordered to Springfield, Ill.

August 29

Second battle of Manassas or Bull Run, Va., began. At its conclusion the next day, Pope's army had been defeated.

August 30

C.S.A. cav. under Act. Brig. Gen. Frank C. Armstrong skirmished with U.S. forces near Bolivar, Tenn.

August 31

Steamboat W. B. Terry was captured by rebel guerrillas on the Tennessee River.

Armstrong skirmished at Medon, Tenn., and near Toone's Station, Tenn.

September 1

C.S.A. Act. Brig. Gen. Frank C. Armstrong concluded his cav. raid on Ulysses S. Grant's forces with a skirmish at Britton's Lane, near Denmark, Tenn.

September 2

Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck ordered Ulysses S. Grant to send the division of Brig. Gen. Gordon Granger to Louisville, Ky.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the division of Brig. Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut to move from Memphis, Tenn., to Bolivar, Tenn.

Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan was restored to command of the Army of the Potomac.

September 13

Col. Robert C. Murphy retreated from Iuka, Miss., abandoning extensive supplies to Maj. Gen. Sterling Price.

September 15

Following the battle at South Mountain the previous day, C.S.A. forces captured Harper's Ferry, Va.

September 16

Ulysses S. Grant began to move his troops toward Iuka.

September 17

Battle of Antietam, Md.

September 18

Ulysses S. Grant moved to Burnsville, Miss., to coordinate the attack on Iuka.

September 19

Brig. Gen. William S. Rosecrans attacked Iuka from the south. U.S. forces were successful despite the failure of Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord to carry through a coordinated attack from the north.

September 20

Price evacuated Iuka, escaping on an uncovered road leading south.

September 22

President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

September 24

Ulysses S. Grant left for St. Louis, Mo., to confer with Maj. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis.

September 26

Ulysses S. Grant's hd. qrs. were moved to Jackson, Tenn.

September 27

Ulysses S. Grant in Columbus, Ky.

September 30

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Corinth, Miss.

October 1

Ulysses S. Grant learned that C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn had moved to threaten either Bolivar or Corinth.

October 3-4

Van Dorn attacked Rosecrans at Corinth, and was repulsed with heavy losses on both days.

October 3

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Hurlbut to advance from Bolivar to block Van Dorn's retreat. Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson reinforced Corinth from Bethel, Tenn.

October 5

Van Dorn's army, in retreat from Corinth, was mauled at Hatchie (Davis's) Bridge, Tenn., by Hurlbut's forces commanded by Ord.

October 7

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Rosecrans to cease his pursuit of Van Dorn. Rosecrans's resentment of the order marked the onset of steadily deteriorating relations with Ulysses S. Grant.

October 8

Lincoln congratulated Ulysses S. Grant on his recent victories.

Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell fought C.S.A. Gen. Braxton Bragg at Perryville, Ky. After an inconclusive battle, Bragg withdrew, ending his invasion of Ky.

October 14

C.S.A. Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton assumed command of the Dept. of Miss, and East La., coordinating the forces opposed to Ulysses S. Grant.

October 16

Ulysses S. Grant was assigned command of the Dept. of the Tenn., which extended from Cairo, Ill., to northern Miss., bounded by the Tennessee and Mississippi rivers.

October 20

Lincoln authorized Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand to organize troops for an expedition against Vicksburg, Miss.

October 23

Halleck ordered Rosecrans to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he received further orders to relieve Buell.

October 25

Ulysses S. Grant assumed command of the Dept. of the Tenn.

Ulysses S. Grant alerted his forces for another C.S.A. move on Bolivar or Corinth.

October 26

Ulysses S. Grant asked Halleck for reinforcements, and proposed an advance down the Mississippi Central Railroad. Halleck promised the reinforcements on Oct. 27.

November 4

Ulysses S. Grant occupied La Grange and Grand Junction, Tenn.

Democrats gained in congressional and state elections.

November 5

Halleck promised Ulysses S. Grant 20,000 additional men.

Lincoln prepared orders relieving McClellan.

November 10

Ulysses S. Grant asked Halleck whether he could command forces at Memphis assembled for McClernand. Halleck replied the next day that Ulysses S. Grant commanded all troops in his dept. and could "fight the enemy when you please."

Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside replaced McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac.

November 12

Ulysses S. Grant prepared to order Hurlbut to Memphis.

November 13

Ulysses S. Grant's cav. occupied Holly Springs, Miss.

Ulysses S. Grant appointed Chaplain John Eaton, 27th Ohio, to take charge of fugitive slaves.

November 14

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman to march from Memphis to join forces in Miss.

November 19

Ulysses S. Grant sent cav. to Ripley, Miss.

Ulysses S. Grant issued orders regulating trade in cotton.

November 21

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Sherman at Memphis.

November 24

C.S.A. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was assigned overall command in the West.

November 28

Ulysses S. Grant left La Grange and spent the night at Lamar, Miss.

November 29

Ulysses S. Grant advanced toward the Tallahatchie River, and established hd. qrs. at Holly Springs.

November 30

Ulysses S. Grant arrested John C. Van Duzer, telegraph superintendent in his dept. On Dec. 5, under orders from Washington, he released Van Duzer and ordered him out of his dept.

December 1

Ulysses S. Grant's cav. crossed the Tallahatchie River, and reached Oxford, Miss., the next day.

Ulysses S. Grant's forces occupied Abbeville, Miss.

December 4

Ulysses S. Grant occupied Oxford.

December 5

Ulysses S. Grant's cav., under Col. T. Lyle Dickey, engaged C.S.A. forces at Coffeeville, Miss.

December 8

Ulysses S. Grant decided to send Sherman to Memphis to launch an attack on Vicksburg on the Mississippi River.

December 9

Ulysses S. Grant prepared to send cav. under Col. T. Lyle Dickey to cut the Mobile and Ohio Railroad.

December 13

Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside suffered a major defeat in the battle of Fredericksburg, Va.

December 15

C.S.A. Brig. Gen. Nathan B. Forrest crossed the Tennessee River on an expedition into west Tenn. to cut Ulysses S. Grant's lines.

December 16

At New Orleans, Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks assumed command of the Dept. of the Gulf, replacing Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler.

December 17

Ulysses S. Grant issued General Orders No. 11 expelling all Jews from the Dept. of the Tenn. On Jan. 4, 1863, Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck ordered Ulysses S. Grant to revoke these orders.

December 18

Ulysses S. Grant received orders to reorganize troops in the Dept. of the Tenn. into the 13th Army Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand; the 15th Army Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman; the 16th Army Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut; and the 17th Army Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson.

December 18

Forrest defeated U.S. cav. at Lexington, Tenn.

December 19

Dickey returned from his cav. expedition with word that C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn's cav. was advancing on Holly Springs, Miss.

December 20

Van Dorn captured Holly Springs and destroyed Ulysses S. Grant's supplies. Ulysses S. Grant began to withdraw his army northward.

Forrest captured Humboldt and Trenton, Tenn.

December 29

Sherman's army was repulsed at Chickasaw Bayou, Miss.

December 31

Brig. Gen. Jeremiah C. Sullivan engaged Forrest at Parker's Cross-Roads, Tenn.

Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans and C.S.A. Gen. Braxton Bragg fought indecisively at Murfreesboro, or Stone's River, Tenn. The battle continued intermittently through Jan. 2, 1863.

January 1

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.

January 4

McClernand superseded Sherman in command of the army near Vicksburg and began to move toward Arkansas Post or Fort Hindman on the Arkansas River.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered McPherson to withdraw from the Tallahatchie River.

January 9

Ulysses S. Grant left Holly Springs for Memphis, arriving the next day.

January 10

McClernand attacked Arkansas Post, capturing it the next day.

January 11

Learning of the Arkansas Post expedition, Ulysses S. Grant telegraphed to Halleck that it was a "wild goose chase."

January 12

Halleck authorized Ulysses S. Grant to relieve McClernand.

January 13

Ulysses S. Grant ordered McClernand to return to Vicksburg and decided to take personal command of the expedition.

January 16

Ulysses S. Grant left Memphis for Vicksburg.

January 17

Ulysses S. Grant was at Helena, Ark.

January 18

At Napoleon, Ark., Ulysses S. Grant conferred with McClernand, Sherman, and Act. Rear Admiral David D. Porter about plans for the Vicksburg expedition.

January 19

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Memphis.

January 21

Halleck authorized Ulysses S. Grant to command troops in Ark. Who could cooperate in the Mississippi River campaign.

January 25

Lincoln appointed Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker to command the Army of the Potomac.

January 28

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Young's Point, La.

January 29

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the levee cut leading to Yazoo Pass, planning an expedition to approach Vicksburg from the north. The levee was cut on Feb. 3.

January 30

Ulysses S. Grant organized an expedition to Lake Providence, La., in an effort to get below Vicksburg.

Ulysses S. Grant assumed command of the Vicksburg expedition, returning McClemand to the 13th Army Corps.

February 2

U.S.S. Queen of the West, commanded by Col. Charles R. Ellet, ran the Vicksburg batteries, damaging but not sinking the steamboat City of Vicksburg.

February 5

Ulysses S. Grant visited Lake Providence.

February 12-13

Ulysses S. Grant again visited Lake Providence.

February 13

Ulysses S. Grant revoked orders issued by Hurlbut prohibiting circulation of the Chicago Times.

U.S.S. Indianola successfully passed the Vicksburg batteries.

February 14

The Queen of the West ran aground in the Red River and was captured by C.S.A. forces.

February 24

The Queen of the West sank the Indianola.

February 25

Light draft U.S. gunboats entered Yazoo Pass.

March 3

Lincoln signed a bill providing an effective draft.

March 11

U.S. gunboats of the Yazoo Pass expedition attacked Fort Pemberton on the Yazoo River. Further unsuccessful attacks occurred on March 13 and 16.

March 14

Porter began the Steele's Bayou expedition in another effort to reach Vicksburg from the north.

March 15

Ulysses S. Grant accompanied Porter on a reconnaissance of Steele's Bayou.

March 16

Ulysses S. Grant sent troops under Sherman to support the Steele's Bayou expedition.

March 19

U.S.S. Hartford and U.S.S. Albatross, commanded by Rear Admiral David G. Farragut, proceeding up the Mississippi River, passed C.S.A. batteries at Grand Gulf, Miss., and anchored near Warrenton, Miss.

March 22

Ulysses S. Grant decided to abandon the Yazoo Pass expedition. On the same day, Porter abandoned the Steele's Bayou expedition.

March 25

U.S. rams Lancaster and Switzerland ran the Vicksburg batteries. The Lancaster was sunk and the Switzerland disabled.

March 29

Ulysses S. Grant decided to send troops under McClernand to New Carthage, La., preparatory to crossing the Mississippi River south of Vicksburg.

Frederick Dent Grant, age twelve, joined his father for the Vicksburg campaign.

April 1

After a reconnaissance on the Yazoo River with Act. Rear Admiral David D. Porter and Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, Ulysses S. Grant decided against an attack on Haynes' Bluff, thus eliminating the last approach to Vicksburg from the north.

April 3

Accompanied by his son, Frederick Dent Grant, Ulysses S. Grant went upriver to Milliken's Bend, La., to make arrangements to move his army to New Carthage, La., south of Vicksburg.

April 7

U.S. naval forces unsuccessfully attacked Charleston, S.C.

April 11

Ulysses S. Grant decided to attack Grand Gulf, Miss.

April 16

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Dent Grant watched seven gunboats, three steamboats, and some barges run the Vicksburg batteries. One steamboat was lost.

April 17

Ulysses S. Grant at Richmond, La.

Col. Benjamin H. Grierson began a cav. raid through Miss, which ended on May 2 when he arrived at Baton Rouge, La.

April 18

Ulysses S. Grant at Smith's Plantation, La., and New Carthage.

April 19

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Milliken's Bend.

April 22

Six steamboats and twelve barges ran the Vicksburg batteries. One steamboat sank, one was totally disabled, one was badly damaged.

April 24

Ulysses S. Grant reconnoitered Grand Gulf.

April 27

Ulysses S. Grant's forty-first birthday.

Ulysses S. Grant asked Sherman to distract C.S.A. attention by making a demonstration at Haynes' Bluff. Sherman did so on April 29.

April 29

After Porter's gunboats engaged the batteries at Grand Gulf, Ulysses S. Grant decided to land troops below.

April 30

Ulysses S. Grant landed troops at Bruinsburg, Miss.

May 1

Battle of Port Gibson, Miss., in which troops of Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand's 13th Army Corps pushed back the force of C.S.A. Maj. Gen. John S. Bowen to secure Ulysses S. Grant's bridgehead in Miss.

May 1-4

Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., which ended in disastrous defeat for Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker's Army of the Potomac.

May 3

Ulysses S. Grant established a supply base at Grand Gulf, which C.S.A. forces had evacuated.

May 5

Ulysses S. Grant reached Hankinson's Ferry, Miss.

May 7

Ulysses S. Grant at Rocky Springs, Miss.

May 9

C.S.A. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston assigned overall command in Miss.

May 9-10

Ulysses S. Grant's forces skirmished near Utica, Miss.

May 10

Ulysses S. Grant at Cayuga.

May 12

Ulysses S. Grant at Fourteen Mile Creek.

Ulysses S. Grant's forces under Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson won a victory at Raymond, Miss.

May 14

Ulysses S. Grant occupied Jackson, Miss., pushing Johnston northward.

May 15

Ulysses S. Grant turned toward Vicksburg, concentrating at Edwards Station, Miss.

May 16

Ulysses S. Grant won the battle of Champion's Hill or Baker's Creek, Miss.

May 17

After an engagement at Big Black River Bridge, Miss., C.S.A. forces withdrew to Vicksburg.

May 18

Ulysses S. Grant besieged Vicksburg.

May 19

Ulysses S. Grant unsuccessfully assaulted Vicksburg.

May 21

U.S. forces under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks besieged Port Hudson, La.

May 22

Ulysses S. Grant's second assault failed with heavy casualties. Ulysses S. Grant placed much blame on inaccurate reports from McClernand.

May 26

Ulysses S. Grant sent an expedition to Mechanicsburg, Miss.

June 2

Ulysses S. Grant ordered a brigade under Brig. Gen. Joseph A. Mower to Mechanicsburg, and the next day sent another brigade under Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball.

June 6

Ulysses S. Grant started toward Satartia, Miss., and Mechanicsburg by river but turned back after learning of enemy action in the area.

June 7

C.S.A. forces attacked the U.S. garrison at Milliken's Bend. Black troops, under fire for the first time, aided by gunboats, repulsed the attack and inflicted heavy casualties.

June 15

Two divs. of the 9th Army Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. John G. Parke, arrived to reinforce Ulysses S. Grant.

June 18

Ulysses S. Grant removed McClernand from command, replacing him with Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord.

June 23

Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans opened the Tullahoma campaign, forcing Gen. Braxton Bragg southward.

June 25

Ulysses S. Grant exploded a mine beneath the Vicksburg fortifications, denting but not breaking the C.S.A. lines.

June 27

Maj. Gen. George G. Meade replaced Hooker as C.S.A. forces entered Pa.

July 1

Three days of battle began at Gettysburg, Pa.

Ulysses S. Grant exploded another mine under the Vicksburg fortifications.

July 3

Ulysses S. Grant and C.S.A. Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton discussed the capitulation of Vicksburg.

July 4

Vicksburg surrendered.

Maj. Gen. Benjamin M. Prentiss repulsed an attack on Helena, Ark.

C.S.A. Gen. Robert E. Lee began to withdraw from Gettysburg.

July 5

Sherman began to advance toward Jackson and Johnston's army.

July 7

Ulysses S. Grant notified of his appointment as Maj. Gen. U.S.A. to date from the surrender of Vicksburg on July 4.

July 9

Port Hudson, La., surrendered to Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks in accordance with terms negotiated the day before. This effectively completed the opening of the Mississippi River.

July 11

Ulysses S. Grant ordered troops to occupy Natchez, Miss.

July 12

Ulysses S. Grant sent an expedition to Yazoo City, Miss.

July 13

Draft riots began in New York City.

U.S. troops occupied Natchez.

July 17

Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, pursuing C.S.A. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, occupied Jackson, Miss., which Johnston had evacuated the day before.

U.S. cav. occupied Canton, Miss., destroying much railroad property.

July 26

C.S.A. Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan captured in Ohio.

July 30

Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck ordered Ulysses S. Grant to send an Army Corps to Banks. On Aug. 7, Ulysses S. Grant selected the 13th Army Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. E. O. C. Ord.

August 1

Ulysses S. Grant and Banks conferred at Vicksburg about an attack on Mobile, Ala. To further this plan, Ulysses S. Grant asked permission to visit New Orleans.

August 23

Ulysses S. Grant at Cairo, Ill., having accompanied Julia Dent Grant partway to St. Louis.

August 26

Ulysses S. Grant at Memphis, where he attended a banquet of loyal citizens.

August 27

Ulysses S. Grant at Helena, Ark.

August 31

Ulysses S. Grant left Vicksburg for New Orleans.

September 2

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at New Orleans.

U.S. troops under Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside occupied Knoxville, Tenn.

September 4

Ulysses S. Grant injured when his horse fell.

September 9

U.S. troops under Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans occupied Chattanooga, Tenn.

September 16

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Vicksburg.

September 19

Battle of Chickamauga began. On the second day, Rosecrans and much of his army fled to Chattanooga, while Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas held his position.

September 22

Ulysses S. Grant began to send reinforcements to Rosecrans, now besieged at Chattanooga by Gen. Braxton Bragg.

September 29

Halleck ordered Ulysses S. Grant to Memphis to supervise the transfer of reinforcements to Rosecrans.

October 2

Troops from the Army of the Potomac under Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker began to arrive at Bridgeport, Ala., to relieve the siege of Chattanooga.

October 3

Ulysses S. Grant ordered to Cairo.

October 10

Ulysses S. Grant prepared to leave Vicksburg, placing Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson in command.

October 14

Ulysses S. Grant at Memphis on his way to Cairo.

October 15

Ulysses S. Grant at Columbus, Ky.

October 16

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Cairo and received orders to proceed to Louisville, Ky.

October 17

Ulysses S. Grant left Cairo for Louisville, meeting Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton in Indianapolis. Ulysses S. Grant received orders to take command of the Military Div. of the Miss., comprising the depts. of the Ohio, Cumberland, and Tenn.

October 18

Ulysses S. Grant, at Louisville, assumed command of the Military Div. of the Miss.

Ulysses S. Grant exercised his option to replace Rosecrans with Thomas.

October 19

Ulysses S. Grant placed Sherman in command of the Dept. of the Tenn.

October 20

Ulysses S. Grant left Louisville for Chattanooga.

October 21

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Bridgeport.

October 23

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Chattanooga.

October 24

Following a survey of the ground, Ulysses S. Grant ordered the opening of a "cracker line" to Brown's Ferry on the Tennessee River.

Sherman assumed command of the Dept. of the Tenn.

October 27

Cracker line opened and siege of Chattanooga relieved. Hooker moved from Bridgeport to the foot of Lookout Mountain.

October 28

C.S.A. Lt. Gen. James Longstreet launched an unsuccessful night attack against Hooker at Wauhatchie, Tenn.

November 4

Bragg sent Longstreet to attack Burnside at Knoxville.

November 7

Ulysses S. Grant planned an assault on Missionary Ridge, but decided against it the next day because of C.S.A. strength and the shortage of supplies and animals in Chattanooga.

November 13

Sherman and the advance of his force reached Bridgeport.

November 15

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Sherman in Chattanooga, while four divs. of Sherman's troops camped at Bridgeport.

November 16

Longstreet besieged Burnside at Knoxville.

November 18

Ulysses S. Grant planned to attack Bragg on November 21.

November 21

Sherman moved to take position on the right of the C.S.A. line.

November 22

Bragg sent forces under Maj. Gen. Simon B. Buckner to aid Longstreet.

November 23

Thomas captured Orchard Knoll as the battle of Chattanooga began. Sherman sent a brigade across the Tennessee River to prepare for an attack the next day.

November 24

Hooker captured Lookout Mountain. Sherman attacked the C.S.A. right.

November 25

Troops under Thomas carried Missionary Ridge, concluding the battle of Chattanooga as Bragg retreated in disorder.

November 25

Ulysses S. Grant made plans to relieve Burnside.

November 27

Ulysses S. Grant at Ringgold, Ga., directing the pursuit of Bragg.

Ulysses S. Grant sent two divs. under Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger to assist Burnside. On November 29, Ulysses S. Grant gave Sherman command of the Knoxville expedition.

November 29

Longstreet launched a desperate and unsuccessful assault on Fort Sanders, attempting to take Knoxville before U.S. reinforcements arrived.

November 30

Bragg relieved of command.

December 1

Ulysses S. Grant again planned an attack on Mobile.

December 3

Longstreet abandoned the siege of Knoxville.

December 6

Sherman and his staff entered Knoxville.

December 8

President Abraham Lincoln issued a Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction.

December 9

Maj. Gen. John G. Foster replaced Burnside in command of the Dept. of the Ohio.

December 14

U.S. Representative Elihu B. Washburne introduced a bill to revive the rank of It. gen., a rank intended for Ulysses S. Grant.

December 16

Johnston assigned to command the Dept. and Army of Tennessee. Johnston assumed command on Dec. 22< at Dalton, Ga.

December 17

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to the chairman of the Ohio Democratic Central Committee that he would not allow his name to be used as a presidential nominee.

Lincoln signed a joint resolution of Congress thanking Ulysses S. Grant and his command and providing a gold medal for Ulysses S. Grant.

December 18

Ulysses S. Grant went to Nashville.

December 28

Ulysses S. Grant back in Chattanooga.

December 31

Ulysses S. Grant reached Knoxville.

January 1

Ulysses S. Grant at Knoxville planned a campaign in east Tenn.

January 3

Ulysses S. Grant at Strawberry Plains, Tenn., examining the position of C.S.A. Lt. Gen. James Longstreet.

January 8

Ulysses S. Grant at Barboursville, Ky., examining supply routes from Ky. into east Tenn.

January 12

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Nashville.

January 16

Longstreet moved toward Knoxville.

January 19

Ulysses S. Grant recommended a campaign in N.C. to cut C.S.A. supply lines to Richmond.

January 21

Ulysses S. Grant at Chattanooga.

January 24

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Maj. Gen. John A. Logan to make a reconnaissance in northern Ala.

Ulysses S. Grant left Chattanooga for St. Louis to visit his son, Frederick Dent Grant, then seriously Ill.

January 27

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at St. Louis.

Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield assigned to command the Dept. of the Ohio in place of Maj. Gen. John G. Foster. Schofield assumed command on Feb. 9.

January 29

Ulysses S. Grant attended a banquet in St. Louis in his honor.

February 1

Ulysses S. Grant left St. Louis for Nashville.

President Abraham Lincoln ordered the draft of 500,000 men on March 10 to serve for three years or the duration of the war.

February 3

Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman left Vicksburg with 26,000 men to destroy C.S.A. communications around Meridian, Miss., returning on March 4.

February 4

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Nashville.

February 10

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas to prepare to move to Knoxville.

February 12

Ulysses S. Grant issued regulations for the sale of cotton.

Ulysses S. Grant suspended the campaign against Longstreet after consulting with Foster; instead, he ordered Thomas to make a demonstration toward Dalton, Ga.

February 22

Thomas began a demonstration toward Dalton.

U.S. cav. under Brig. Gen. William Sooy Smith defeated by C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Nathan B. Forrest at Okolona, Miss., after failing to connect with Sherman's expedition to Meridian.

February 24

U.S. forces gained possession of Tunnel Hill, Ga.

February 25

Ulysses S. Grant decided not to go to Chattanooga because of illness.

February 26

Demonstration toward Dalton stopped by strong C.S.A. position at Buzzard Roost, Ga.

February 29

Lincoln signed into law the bill reviving the grade of It. gen. and nominated Ulysses S. Grant for that rank.

March 1

A U.S. raid on Richmond led by Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick and Col. Ulric Dahlgren failed, with Dahlgren being killed during the retreat.

March 2

Ulysses S. Grant confirmed by the Senate as It. gen.

March 3

Ulysses S. Grant ordered to report in person to Washington.

March 8

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Washington accompanied by his oldest son Fred, and attended a reception at the White House.

March 9

Ulysses S. Grant received his commission as It. gen. in a ceremony at the White House.

March 10

Ulysses S. Grant assigned to command the Armies of the U.S. He made a quick trip to see Maj. Gen. George G. Meade and the Army of the Potomac.

March 11

Ulysses S. Grant started back to Nashville to wrap up affairs in the Military Div. of the Miss.

March 12

Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks began the Red River Campaign.

March 14

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Nashville and ordered the 9th Army Corps to Annapolis, Md.

March 17

Ulysses S. Grant issued General Orders No. 1, assuming command of the Armies of the U.S. with his hd. qrs. in the field.

March 18

Ulysses S. Grant accepted a ceremonial sword presented by citizens of Jo Daviess County, Ill., and left Nashville for the East.

Sherman assumed command of the Military Div. of the Miss.

March 22

Ulysses S. Grant at Philadelphia.

March 23

Ulysses S. Grant sat for photographer Mathew Brady in Washington.

March 24

Ulysses S. Grant established hd. qrs. in the field at Culpeper Court House, Va., with the Army of the Potomac, and started planning a coordinated spring campaign.

Forrest again moved into west Tenn.

March 26

Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson assumed command of the Army of the Tenn.

March 28

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington.

March 31

Ulysses S. Grant passed through Washington en route to Fort Monroe, Va.

April 1

Ulysses S. Grant visited Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler at Fort Monroe to consult about the spring campaign.

April 4

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington.

April 5

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Culpeper.

April 7

Longstreet ordered to return to the Army of Northern Va.

April 8

Banks defeated at the battle of Sabine Crossroads, La.

April 12

C.S.A. forces commanded by Forrest captured Fort Pillow, Tenn., and Negro troops of the garrison were killed after the surrender.

April 13

Ulysses S. Grant visited Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside and the 9th Army Corps at Annapolis.

April 15

C.S.A. guerrillas attacked Bristoe Station, Va., shortly after Ulysses S. Grant's train passed by.

April 15

Ulysses S. Grant decided to relieve Maj. Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut at Memphis after learning of the capture of Fort Pillow, sending Maj. Gen. Cadwallader C. Washburn the next day.

April 17

Ulysses S. Grant ordered a halt to the exchange of prisoners until C.S.A. authorities agreed to equalize the exchange and make no distinction "between white and colored prisoners."

April 20

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Lincoln in Washington.

Plymouth, N.C., with 2,800 men captured by C.S.A. forces.

April 22

Ulysses S. Grant decided to abandon Plymouth and Washington, N.C., unaware of the capture of Plymouth until April 24.

Ulysses S. Grant requested the replacement of Banks, but for political reasons, Lincoln was unwilling to act.

April 27

Ulysses S. Grant's forty-second birthday.

May 1

Ulysses S. Grant thanked Lincoln for his confidence and support.

May 4

The Army of the Potomac crossed the Rapidan River.

May 5-6

Battle of the Wilderness with heavy casualties suffered by both sides.

May 5

Butler landed his Army of the James at City Point and Bermuda Hundred, Va.

U.S. cav. began a raid against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad from W.Va.

May 7

Sherman began to move toward Atlanta with more than 100,000 men.

May 8

The Army of the Potomac arrived at Spotsylvania Court House only to find that C.S.A. forces had arrived first. Fighting began, continuing the next day.

May 10

C.S.A. forces repulsed a U.S. attack at Spotsylvania.

May 11

U.S. cav. commanded by Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan mortally wounded C.S.A. Lt. Gen. James E. B. Stuart during the battle of Yellow Tavern, Va.

May 12

U.S. forces captured 4,000 C.S.A. troops at Spotsylvania during the battle of "Bloody Angle."

Sherman maneuvered C.S.A. forces out of Dalton.

May 13

Ulysses S. Grant continued shifting the Army of the Potomac.

May 14

Battle of Resaca, Ga., began, ending the following day with the withdrawal of C.S.A. forces.

May 15

Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel defeated by C.S.A. forces at New Market, Va.

May 16

Ulysses S. Grant again requested that Banks be removed from active command, unaware that Maj. Gen. Edward R. S. Canby had been sent to do so on May 7.

Butler retreated after the battle of Drewry's Bluff, or Fort Darling, Va., and was bottled up in Bermuda Hundred the following day by smaller C.S.A. forces.

May 18

After another assault failed at Spotsylvania, Ulysses S. Grant decided to shift his army southward.

May 19

C.S.A. forces repulsed in an attack on the U.S. right in the last engagement at Spotsylvania.

May 19

Maj. Gen. David Hunter replaced Sigel in command of the Dept.of W.Va.

May 23-26

Battle of North Anna fought by the Army of the Potomac.

May 25

Sherman stopped by C.S.A. forces at New Hope Church, Ga.

May 26

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Meade to withdraw from the North Anna to move to the right of the Army of Northern Va.

May 27

U.S. cav. occupied Hanovertown, Va.

May 28

The Army of Northern Va. approached Cold Harbor, Va.

May 31

Ulysses S. Grant shifted U.S. forces toward Cold Harbor.

June 1

The battle of Cold Harbor, Va., started with U.S. forces making initial gains. Ulysses S. Grant planned to renew the assault the following day but postponed the attack due to delays in troop movements.

June 3

U.S. forces made an unsuccessful second assault at Cold Harbor sustaining heavy casualties. "I regret this assault more than any one I have ever ordered," Ulysses S. Grant later remarked.

Ulysses S. Grant directed that surplus troops in the West be used against Mobile.

June 4

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Maj. Gen. George G. Meade to fire art. At Cold Harbor to keep C.S.A. forces awake.

June 5

Ulysses S. Grant planned to move the Army of the Potomac across the James River to attack C.S.A. forces south of Richmond.

June 5-7

Ulysses S. Grant corresponded with C.S.A. Gen. Robert E. Lee regarding wounded between the lines at Cold Harbor.

June 7

Ulysses S. Grant sent Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan on a cav. Raid from Cold Harbor to destroy C.S.A. supply lines with instructions to connect with Maj. Gen. David Hunter advancing on Lynchburg, Va.

June 8

President Abraham Lincoln nominated to run for a second term.

June 9

Ulysses S. Grant believed that the campaign in Va. would ultimately "settle down to a siege."

June 11

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler about the movement of U.S. forces south of the James River.

June 12

Ulysses S. Grant began a movement to cross the James River.

June 13

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at the James River.

June 14

Ulysses S. Grant at Bermuda Hundred, Va.

June 15

Ulysses S. Grant decided to make City Point, Va., his hd. qrs. For operations against Petersburg, Va.

Maj. Gen. William F. Smith attacked and captured lightly held C.S.A. fortifications in front of Petersburg but inexplicably failed to exploit his advantage.

June 16

Ulysses S. Grant arrived near Petersburg, while U.S. forces assaulted C.S.A. lines with limited success.

June 17

U.S. forces under Butler failed to break the railroad between Petersburg and Richmond.

June 18

After another unsuccessful assault, Ulysses S. Grant suspended offensive operations and began the siege of Petersburg.

June 19

C.S.S. Alabama sunk by the U.S.S. Kearsarge off Cherbourg, France.

Sheridan returned from cav. raid without making a junction with Hunter.

June 21

Lincoln arrived at City Point and toured the front with Ulysses S. Grant.

June 22

Ulysses S. Grant sent cav. led by Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson to interdict supply lines at Burkeville, Va.

Lee repulsed an attempt to cut the Weldon Railroad as Ulysses S. Grant extended the siege lines west and south of Petersburg.

June 23

Ulysses S. Grant anticipated a protracted siege at Petersburg.

June 24

Ulysses S. Grant suggested the removal of Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans.

Sheridan's cav. repulsed an attack at St. Mary's Church, Va., while on the way to City Point.

June 25

Coalminers of 48th Pa. began a tunnel at Petersburg to undermine C.S.A. works. Ulysses S. Grant informed on July 4.

June 27

U.S. forces under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman repulsed at the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Ga.

June 28

Ulysses S. Grant planned to attack C.S.A. lines between Petersburg and Richmond.

July 1

Ulysses S. Grant requested that Butler be relieved from field command and asked for a specific order on July 6. After talking with Butler on July 9, Ulysses S. Grant suspended the order the following day.

Wilson returned with his cav. from Burkeville losing his art. and much of his equipment. Damage inflicted by the raiders on C.S.A. supply lines was quickly repaired.

July 2

Sherman forced evacuation of C.S.A. positions at Kennesaw Mountain by a flanking movement.

Maj. Gen. William F. Smith requested a leave of absence, complaining bitterly to Ulysses S. Grant about Butler.

July 3

C.S.A. Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early, continuing an advance in the Shenandoah Valley, arrived at Harpers Ferry, W. Va.

July 5

Ulysses S. Grant ordered some cav. and a div. of the 6th Army Corps to Washington via Baltimore to counter Early's movement.

Ulysses S. Grant concluded that C.S.A. lines at Petersburg were too strong to be taken by frontal assault.

July 7

Ulysses S. Grant requested the relief of Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel because his "operations from the beginning of the war have been so unsuccessful..."

July 8

Ulysses S. Grant asked Lee to allow Col. James F. Jaquess and James R. Gilmore to pass through C.S.A. lines on an unofficial peace mission sanctioned by Lincoln.

July 9

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the remainder of the 6th Army Corps and the 19th Army Corps to Washington to defend against Early.

Maj. Gen. Lewis Wallace defeated by Early in the battle of Monocacy, Md., but delayed the C.S.A. advance on Washington by one day.

July 11

Early's forces skirmished with U.S. forces in the defenses of Washington.

July 12

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. Horatio G. Wright to pursue Early as C.S.A. forces withdrew from Washington.

July 14

Ulysses S. Grant ordered that the Shenandoah Valley be stripped of supplies "so that Crows flying over it for the balance of this season will have to carry their provender with them."

C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Nathan B. Forrest checked at the battle of Tupelo or Harrisburg, Miss.

July 16

Ulysses S. Grant warned Sherman that C.S.A. reinforcements might be sent to Ga. in light of the failure of the raid against Washington.

July 17

C.S.A. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston replaced in command in Ga. by Gen. John B. Hood.

July 18

Ulysses S. Grant wanted to establish one dept. to control all operations around Washington and in the Shenandoah Valley.

Lincoln issued a call for 500,000 volunteers.

July 19

Ulysses S. Grant relieved Maj. Gen. William F. Smith from command of the 18th Army Corps.

July 20

Hood defeated at the battle of Peachtree Creek, Ga.

July 21

Ulysses S. Grant decided to leave the 6th Army Corps and 19th Army Corps in the Shenandoah Valley for offensive operations.

July 22

Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson killed during the battle of Atlanta as U.S. forces closed in on the city.

July 24

Early won the second battle of Kernstown, Va., and again moved north through the Shenandoah Valley.

Meade informed Ulysses S. Grant that he had little confidence that an assault on Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside's front would succeed after the explosion of the mine.

July 25

Ulysses S. Grant planned a two-pronged offensive at Petersburg operating north of the James River to draw off C.S.A. forces from the area of the undermined line, south of the city.

July 27

Ulysses S. Grant, at Deep Bottom, Va., oversaw the movement of Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock north of the James River.

July 28

Ulysses S. Grant again at Deep Bottom to observe Hancock's movements which had drawn substantial C.S.A. forces north of the river weakening C.S.A. lines south of Petersburg.

Hood defeated in the battle of Ezra Church, Ga.

July 30

Ulysses S. Grant witnessed the battle of the Crater, later calling it the "saddest affair I have witnessed in this war. Such opportunity for carrying fortifications I have never seen and do not expect again to have."

July 31

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Lincoln at Fort Monroe, Va., for five hours.

August 1

Ulysses S. Grant decided to send Sheridan to the Shenandoah Valley to command "all the troops in the field with instructions to put himself south of the enemy and follow him to the death..."

August 2

Ulysses S. Grant, ill after the battle of the Crater, requested a court of inquiry.

August 4

Ulysses S. Grant went to Washington to arrange affairs in the Shenandoah Valley after Lincoln telegraphed on Aug. 3 that nothing would be accomplished there unless "you watch it every day, and hour, and force it."

August 5

Ulysses S. Grant at War Dept. in Washington.

U.S. Navy victory at the battle of Mobile Bay.

August 7

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington.

August 8

Ulysses S. Grant at Fort Monroe on his way to City Point.

August 9

Ulysses S. Grant informed Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck that "Every part of the yard occupied as my Hd Qrs is filled with splinters and fragments of shells," as C.S.A. agents exploded an ordnance boat being unloaded at the wharf at City Point.

August 12

Ulysses S. Grant warned Sheridan that C.S.A. reinforcements might have gone to Shenandoah Valley.

August 13

Ulysses S. Grant arranged to reinforce Sherman.

Ulysses S. Grant granted Burnside a leave of absence from command of the 9th Army Corps after the failure of the battle of the Crater. He decided on September 1 not to allow Burnside to return to the field although never officially relieving him from command.

August 14

Ulysses S. Grant, at Strawberry Plains, Va., observed a demonstration led by Hancock.

August 15

Ulysses S. Grant made clear his determination to continue the siege at Petersburg despite numerous disappointments.

August 16

Ulysses S. Grant reported continued fighting north of the James River as Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock probed C.S.A. lines with inconclusive results. The siege of Petersburg, Va., continued.

August 17

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. George G. Meade to attack the Weldon Railroad the following day.

August 18-19

Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren suffered heavy losses in the battle of the Weldon Railroad but held his position, cutting a major C.S.A. supply route.

August 20

Ulysses S. Grant directed Hancock to abandon his probe north of the James River.

August 21

C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Nathan B. Forrest briefly occupied Memphis.

U.S. forces repulsed a C.S.A. counterattack on the Weldon Railroad.

August 22

Ulysses S. Grant canceled an attack planned for Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler north of the James River.

August 23

Ulysses S. Grant suspended offensive operations on the Weldon Railroad.

August 25

Hancock's 2nd Army Corps suffered heavy losses during the battle of Reams' Station, Va.

August 27

Ulysses S. Grant left for a visit with Julia Dent Grant at Fort Monroe, Va., bringing her to City Point, Va., the following day.

August 30

Ulysses S. Grant testified before the court of inquiry investigating the battle of the Crater.

August 31

Ulysses S. Grant escorted Julia Grant to Fort Monroe on her way to Burlington, N.J.

Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan nominated for president by the Democratic Party.

August 31-September 1

Ulysses S. Grant at Norfolk, Va.

C.S.A. Gen. John B. Hood defeated by Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman in the battle of Jonesboro, Ga. At the conclusion, C.S.A. forces evacuated Atlanta.

September 1-2

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Assistant Secretary of the Navy Gustavus V. Fox regarding a possible expedition against Wilmington, N.C.

September 2

Atlanta occupied by U.S. forces, and, on September 4, Ulysses S. Grant directed U.S. batteries at Petersburg to fire a salute in honor of the capture.

September 7

Sherman ordered civilians to evacuate Atlanta.

September 8

McClellan accepted the Democratic nomination for president although disavowing the "peace plank" in the Democratic platform.

September 10

Ulysses S. Grant expressed his willingness to send an expedition against Wilmington in cooperation with the Navy.

Ulysses S. Grant considered the possibility of a further campaign in Ga., and, on September 12, sent Lt. Col. Horace Porter to confer with Sherman at Atlanta.

September 15

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to visit Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to expedite the campaign in the Shenandoah Valley.

September 16

Ulysses S. Grant at Baltimore.

C.S.A. cav. raided Coggins' Point, Va., driving off the cattle of the Army of the Potomac.

September 16-17

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Sheridan at Charles Town, W. Va.

September 17

John C. Fremont withdrew as a presidential candidate.

September 18

Ulysses S. Grant visited his family at Burlington, returning via Philadelphia.

September 19

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at City Point.

Sheridan won the third battle of Winchester or Opequon Creek, Va., and, on September 20, Ulysses S. Grant ordered a salute fired in honor of the victory.

September 20

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Fox and Rear Admiral David D. Porter about the Wilmington expedition.

C.S.A. President Jefferson Davis left Richmond for Ga. To attempt to redeem C.S.A. fortunes there.

September 22

Sheridan again defeated Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early at the battle of Fisher's Hill, Va.

September 24

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Meade to plan another offensive at Petersburg.

September 25

Davis visited Hood's hd. qrs. at Palmetto, Ga.

September 29-October 2

Ulysses S. Grant launched a two-pronged offensive at Petersburg, fighting the battles of Peeble's Farm, Va., and Fort Harrison or Chaffin's Farm, Va., extending the siege lines west and north of Petersburg.

September 29

Ulysses S. Grant, at Chaffin's Farm, directed the battle north of the James River.September 29-October 2Ulysses S. Grant at Signal Hill and at Deep Bottom, Va.

September 30

Ulysses S. Grant at Deep Bottom.

October 1

Ulysses S. Grant at the junction of Varina and New Market roads north of the James River.

October 2

Ulysses S. Grant at Deep Bottom.

October 2-3

Ulysses S. Grant corresponded with C.S.A. Gen. Robert E. Lee, insisting that captured Negro soldiers be exchanged on the same basis as white soldiers.

October 4

Ulysses S. Grant stated that Sherman was capable of making his way to the Atlantic Coast from Atlanta.

October 5

U.S. forces held off C.S.A. forces during the engagement of Allatoona, Ga.

October 6-9

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to Washington to expedite recruits going to the front.

October 7

C.S.A. forces repulsed at Chaffin's Farm with heavy losses.

October 11

Ulysses S. Grant again recommended the replacement of Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans in Mo.

Republicans won elections in Pa., Ohio, and Ind.

October 12

Ulysses S. Grant directed Butler to make a reconnaissance in force on his front.

President Abraham Lincoln worried about Sherman's proposed march to the sea, and the next day Ulysses S. Grant stated that "Sherman's proposition is the best that can be adopted...."

October 16-17

Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton visited the front at Petersburg and conferred with Ulysses S. Grant.

October 17

Ulysses S. Grant prepared supplies to meet Sherman's army on the coast.

October 18-20

Ulysses S. Grant corresponded with Lee about providing mutual relief for prisoners of war.

October 19

Early attacked U.S. forces in the battle of Cedar Creek, Va., with initial gains, only to be defeated decisively after Sheridan rallied his forces in the last major battle in the Shenandoah Valley. On Oct. 20, Ulysses S. Grant ordered a salute fired in honor of the victory.

October 21

Ulysses S. Grant and Meade toured the front along the Weldon Railroad.

October 23

C.S.A. Maj. Gen. Sterling Price defeated at the battle of Westport, Mo., the last major battle west of the Mississippi River.

October 24

Ulysses S. Grant sent troops to New York City to maintain order during the presidential election.

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Meade to prepare his forces for an offensive movement on Oct. 27.

October 25

Ulysses S. Grant approved a proposal to organize the 1st Veteran Army Corps.

October 27

As Butler made a diversion north of the James River, Ulysses S. Grant came under fire south of the river while observing the engagement at Hatcher's Run, Va. (also known as Burgess' Mill or Boydton Plank Road). C.S.A. forces maintained control of the Southside Railroad.

October 30

Ulysses S. Grant sent Chief of Staff Brig. Gen. John A. Rawlins to Mo. to ensure that Rosecrans forwarded troops to Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas.

November 1

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Butler to New York City to take charge of troops sent to maintain order during the election.

November 5

Ulysses S. Grant prepared for a possible C.S.A. attack on November 8, the day soldiers voted in the presidential election.

November 6

Ulysses S. Grant opened correspondence with C.S.A. Agent of Exchange Robert Ould about a plan to exchange C.S.A. cotton for goods to provide relief for prisoners held in the North.

November 7

The second and last session of the C.S.A. Congress opened in Richmond, Va.

November 8

Lincoln reelected president.

November 12

Ulysses S. Grant continued correspondence with Ould regarding sale of cotton to provide money for relief of C.S.A. prisoners.

November 13

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Porter and Fox at City Point about the Wilmington expedition.

November 14

Ulysses S. Grant at Fort Monroe and returned to City Point that evening.

Rawlins in Washington planned to return to City Point the following day.

November 15

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Thomas that Hood should "be pressed with such force as you can bring to bear."

Ulysses S. Grant prepared to leave City Point for a visit to Burlington.

November 16

Ulysses S. Grant at City Point as the siege of Petersburg continued.

Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman left Atlanta with some 60,000 men to begin his march across Ga. to the sea.

November 17

Ulysses S. Grant started for Burlington, N.J., to visit his family.

November 19

Ulysses S. Grant at Burlington.

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to consider an attempt to cut the Virginia Central Railroad.

November 20

Ulysses S. Grant at New York City.

November 21

C.S.A. Gen. John B. Hood advanced into Tenn.

November 23

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington consulted with Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton.

November 24

Ulysses S. Grant returned to City Point and instructed Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas to move against Hood.

November 25

Ulysses S. Grant requested the removal of Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans from command in Mo. He also conferred with Maj. Gen. George G. Meade about operations at Petersburg.

November 27

Ulysses S. Grant encouraged Thomas to take the offensive against Hood.

November 28

Ulysses S. Grant again requested Rosecrans's replacement.

November 29

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler and Rear Admiral David D. Porter about the expedition to capture Fort Fisher and Wilmington, N.C.

November 30

Ulysses S. Grant proposed to place Maj. Gen. John Pope in command of the Military Div. of the Mo., making a formal request to President Abraham Lincoln on Dec. 7.

Hood failed to break U.S. lines during the battle of Franklin, Tenn., and Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield withdrew toward Nashville during the night.

December 1

Ulysses S. Grant arranged relief for U.S. prisoners of war in the South.

December 2

Ulysses S. Grant requested Stanton to relieve Rosecrans, and again suggested that Thomas take the offensive.

December 3

Ulysses S. Grant planned an expedition down the Weldon Railroad which started on Dec. 7 under command of Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren.

December 5

Ulysses S. Grant again suggested offensive movements to Thomas.

December 6

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Thomas to attack Hood.

December 7

Ulysses S. Grant informed Stanton that it might be necessary to relieve Thomas.

December 8

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck to issue orders relieving Thomas, suspending the order later in the day.

December 9

Ulysses S. Grant informed Thomas that he had suspended the order for his relief.

December 10

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord to be prepared for a possible C.S.A. attack north of the James River.

Sherman's army emerged near Savannah, Ga.

December 11

Ulysses S. Grant pressed Thomas to attack Hood.

December 13

Ulysses S. Grant sent Maj. Gen. John A. Logan to Nashville with orders to relieve Thomas.

Sherman reached the sea, capturing Fort McAllister, Ga.

December 14

Ulysses S. Grant started from City Point for Nashville to oversee operations and reached Washington the following day. He stopped there after learning that Thomas had attacked Hood.

December 15-16

Thomas won the battle of Nashville, virtually destroying Hood's army.

December 17

Ulysses S. Grant (at Burlington) instructed Logan not to continue to Nashville.

December 18

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington decided not to bring Sherman's army to City Point by water because of lack of transportation; instead, Sherman would march northward through the Carolinas.

December 19

Ulysses S. Grant at City Point informed Sherman about rumors that C.S.A. President Jefferson Davis was in poor health.

December 20

Ulysses S. Grant testified before the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War concerning the battle of the Crater.

C.S.A. forces evacuated Savannah and Sherman presented the city to Lincoln for Christmas on Dec. 22.

December 22

Ulysses S. Grant ill.

December 24

Ulysses S. Grant arranged to send blankets and clothing to U.S. prisoners in Richmond.

December 25

Frederick Dent Grant, Ulysses S. Grant's son, arrived at City Point for a visit, returning home on Jan. 1.

Butler failed to capture Fort Fisher and returned to Hampton Roads, Va., even though Ulysses S. Grant had directed him to begin siege operations if the attack failed.

December 28

Lincoln issued a pass to Francis P. Blair, Sr., to travel to Richmond on a peace mission to Davis. Blair finally conferred with Davis on Jan. 12 with inconclusive results.

December 29

Ulysses S. Grant at Fort Monroe.

December 30

Ulysses S. Grant prepared to send a second expedition against Fort Fisher and Wilmington under the command of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Alfred H. Terry. He also directed that U.S. forces hold Fort Smith, Ark.

January 2

Ulysses S. Grant continued preparations for the second expedition to Fort Fisher, planning to embark troops by Jan. 6.

January 3

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Terry about the expedition to Fort Fisher.

January 4

Ulysses S. Grant requested Stanton to relieve Butler from command, and, upon learning that Stanton had left for Savannah, asked Lincoln on Jan. 6. The following day Ord replaced Butler as commander of the Dept. of Va. and N.C.

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. Edward R. S. Canby to move against Mobile.

Ulysses S. Grant thanked the citizens of Philadelphia for giving him a furnished house.

January 5

Ulysses S. Grant at Fort Monroe to see off the Fort Fisher expedition, spending the night at Norfolk.

January 6

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Sherman to organize Negro troops to garrison forts and islands along the coast of Ga. and S.C.

January 7

Ulysses S. Grant decided to transfer Schofield and his corps from Tenn. for duty in N.C.

January 8

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. Irvin McDowell to move into Mexico if used by C.S.A. forces as a base of operations.

January 10

Ulysses S. Grant arranged to buy property in Mo. owned by his brother-in-law John C. Dent for back taxes.

January 13

U.S. forces landed near Fort Fisher, capturing the fort on Jan. 15.

January 15

Ulysses S. Grant continued to seek means to provide relief for U.S. prisoners in the South.

January 17

Ulysses S. Grant learned of the capture of Fort Fisher and immediately recommended Terry for promotion.

January 18

Ulysses S. Grant informed Halleck that he believed Thomas incapable of directing rapid offensive movements.

January 20

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to Washington to confer the following day with Halleck and Stanton about future operations.

January 21

Ulysses S. Grant at Annapolis Junction, Md., agreed to accept Robert Todd Lincoln, the President's son, on his staff with the rank of capt.

Ulysses S. Grant sent Maj. Gen. Lewis Wallace on a mission to Tex. to determine if C.S.A. forces might surrender in the region.

Ulysses S. Grant authorized negotiations to arrange for the exchange of all prisoners.

January 23

Ulysses S. Grant at City Point urged the confirmation of Meade as maj. gen. Confirmation came on Feb. 2.

January 24

C.S.A. rams moved down the James River to attack City Point. The attempt failed. Ulysses S. Grant requested the relief of the U.S. Navy commander on the James because he failed to take precautions even after a warning of C.S.A. plans on Jan. 21.

January 26

Ulysses S. Grant decided to visit Fort Fisher accompanied by Schofield and Asst. Secretary of the Navy Gustavus V. Fox, leaving Hampton Roads the following day.

January 31

Ulysses S. Grant returned to City Point to find three informal C.S.A. peace emissaries, a result of Blair's discussions with Davis.

February 1

Ulysses S. Grant recommended that the President meet the C.S.A. peace emissaries, and Lincoln held an unproductive conference at Hampton Roads on Feb. 3.

February 2

Ulysses S. Grant continued negotiations for the exchange of prisoners, and instructed Ord to examine ways to attack Richmond.

February 4

Ulysses S. Grant informed Stanton that he did not want to begin final offensive operations at Petersburg until Schofield and Sherman were in place in N.C. Ulysses S. Grant also directed Meade to move west of Petersburg the following day.

February 5

Ulysses S. Grant completed arrangements to begin exchanging prisoners.

February 5-7

U.S. forces extended the siege lines west of Petersburg during the battle of Hatcher's Run.

February 6

Ulysses S. Grant directed Meade not to attack entrenched positions.

February 8

Ulysses S. Grant renewed instructions to Sheridan to attempt to cut the Virginia Central Railroad and the James River Canal.

February 9

Ulysses S. Grant left City Point, arriving in Washington the following day.

February 11

Ulysses S. Grant testified before the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War about Butler's failure to take Fort Fisher.

February 12

Ulysses S. Grant at Fort Monroe on his return to City Point.

February 13

Ulysses S. Grant informed that the government was having difficulty raising enough money to pay the army.

February 16

Ulysses S. Grant arranged to supply Sherman's army when it arrived in N.C.

February 17

Sherman captured Columbia, S.C., forcing C.S.A. evacuation of Charleston which U.S. forces occupied the following day.

February 20

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Sheridan to prepare a cav. raid and ordered a one hundred gun salute in honor of the occupation of Columbia and Charleston.

February 21

The siege at Petersburg continued. Ulysses S. Grant refused to allow the French consul at Richmond to pass through U.S. lines to Washington, and he planned a cav. expedition for Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan.

February 21

Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman continued to march his army northward through the Carolinas with a goal of uniting with Ulysses S. Grant at Petersburg.

Robert Todd Lincoln, President Abraham Lincoln's son, arrived at City Point to assume duties on Ulysses S. Grant's staff.

February 22

Ulysses S. Grant arranged transportation to Philadelphia for Maj. Gen. George G. Meade upon learning of the death of Meade's son. Maj. Gen. John G. Parke temporarily commanded the Army of the Potomac and Ulysses S. Grant instructed him to be ready at all times for a C.S.A. attack.

U.S. forces commanded by Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield occupied Wilmington, N.C., closing the last major Southern port.

February 23

Ulysses S. Grant protested to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton against giving a new command to Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler.

February 24

Ulysses S. Grant informed Stanton about the growing number of C.S.A. deserters entering U.S. lines.

March 11

U.S. Representative Elihu B. Washburne presented to Ulysses S. Grant a gold medal authorized by a Joint Resolution of Congress to honor the victory at Chattanooga in 1863.

March 12

Ulysses S. Grant sent supplies to White House, Va., anticipating the arrival of Sheridan's expedition.

March 13

Ulysses S. Grant noted Canby's slowness in moving against Mobile, and informed Stanton the next day that Sheridan would be sent to the Gulf Coast when he could be spared.

March 14

Ulysses S. Grant protested to Lee about the murder of white officers of Negro troops after their capture by C.S.A. forces. He also instructed Meade to have the Army of the Potomac ready to pursue Lee on short notice, and decided to bring Sheridan and his cav. to Petersburg.

March 16

Ulysses S. Grant learned that Sherman had occupied Fayetteville, N.C., on March 11. Stanton arrived at City Point to confer with Ulysses S. Grant, returning to Washington on March 18.

March 18

Sheridan arrived at White House, Va., after breaking the James River Canal and Virginia Central Railroad.

March 19

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Sheridan to prepare for offensive operations west of Petersburg.

March 19-21

C.S.A. forces defeated by Sherman in the battle of Bentonville, N.C., and Schofield occupied Goldsboro, N.C., on March 21.

March 20

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Maj. Gen. John Pope to prepare to move into Tex.

March 21

Ulysses S. Grant called attention to the fact that Negro troops had gone unpaid for over six months.

March 24

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Meade and Ord to prepare for offensive operations west of Petersburg to begin on March 29.

Lincoln arrived at City Point, having been invited by Ulysses S. Grant.

March 25

C.S.A. forces attacked Fort Stedman at Petersburg. After Lee made initial gains, U.S. forces repulsed the attack and inflicted heavy losses.

March 27

Sherman arrived at City Point to consult with Ulysses S. Grant about final strategy, meeting with Lincoln, Sheridan, Ord, and Meade. Sherman returned to N.C. the following day.

Ord began crossing to the south side of the James River with three divs. to reach his position for the assault.

March 28

U.S. forces under Meade, Sheridan, and Ord in place for offensive operations. Ulysses S. Grant had decided to accompany this movement and to direct operations personally.

March 29

Ulysses S. Grant at Gravelly Run as the Appomattox campaign began, detennined to make this offensive the final campaign against Lee.

March 30

Ulysses S. Grant at Gravelly Run reported to Lincoln that the campaign progressed well. Although urged to cancel the offensive because of heavy rain, Ulysses S. Grant decided to press on after conferring with Sheridan.

March 31

Ulysses S. Grant switched his hd. qrs. to Dabney's Mill in the afternoon as operations continued. He directed Meade to reinforce Sheridan at Five Forks.

April 1

Ulysses S. Grant at Dabney's Mill learned of Sheridan's victory at the battle of Five Forks and ordered an assault all along the lines for the following morning.

April 2

U.S. forces captured the lines at Petersburg and the C.S.A. government evacuated Richmond. Ulysses S. Grant moved his hd. qrs. To the Banks House near the Boydton Plank Road, and invited Lincoln to visit the captured works.

April 3

Ulysses S. Grant met with Lincoln at a private home inside Petersburg, leaving during the early afternoon to accompany U.S. forces pursuing Lee's army, spending the night at Sutherland's Station on the South Side Railroad.

U.S. forces commanded by Maj. Gen. Godfrey Weitzel entered Richmond at 8:15 A.M.

April 4

Ulysses S. Grant at Wilson's Station on the South Side Railroad as the pursuit of Lee's army continued.

April 5

Ulysses S. Grant started from Wilson's Station early in the morning, arrived at Nottoway Court House in the late afternoon, passed through Burkeville, arriving at Jetersville on the Richmond and Danville Railroad in the late evening near Sayler's Creek.

April 6

Ulysses S. Grant at Jetersville as Sheridan defeated C.S.A. forces at the battle of Sayler's Creek, the last major engagement between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Va. Ulysses S. Grant returned to Burkeville in the evening to spend the night.

April 7

Ulysses S. Grant at Farmville wrote to Lee asking for his surrender.

April 8

Ulysses S. Grant at Farmville continued correspondence with Lee.

April 9

Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Va. to Ulysses S. Grant in the house of Wilmer McLean at Appomattox Court House.

April 10

Ulysses S. Grant talked privately with Lee at Appomattox Court House. He arrived at Prospect Station on the South Side Railroad in the evening.

April 11

Ulysses S. Grant at Burke's Station.

April 12

Ulysses S. Grant at City Point, then left for Washington during the afternoon.

C.S.A. forces surrendered Mobile to Canby.

April 13

Ulysses S. Grant established hd. qrs. at Washington.

April 14

Ulysses S. Grant left Washington to visit his children at Burlington, N.J., declining an invitation to attend Ford's Theatre that evening with the Lincolns.

Lincoln assassinated, dying the following morning.

U.S. forces officially raised the flag at Fort Sumter, S.C.

April 15

Ulysses S. Grant learned of Lincoln's assassination and left Burlington at 6:00 A.M. to return to Washington, arriving at 1:00 P.M. Late in the afternoon he directed Ord to arrest certain C.S.A. officials in Richmond, suspending the order during the evening.

Andrew Johnson sworn in as President.

April 16

Ulysses S. Grant decided to send Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck to command at Richmond.

April 17

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Canby to prepare for a campaign in Tex. and directed Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas to withdraw the bulk of U.S. forces from east Tenn.

April 18

Sherman signed a general surrender agreement with C.S.A. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston subject to the approval of Johnson.

April 19

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Ord about the treatment of paroled C.S.A. prisoners at Richmond.

April 21

Ulysses S. Grant learned of the extent of Sherman's accord and recommended to Stanton that a cabinet meeting be called. Johnson disapproved the agreement and directed Ulysses S. Grant to go to N.C. to oversee resumption of hostilities. Ulysses S. Grant left Washington at midnight.

April 22

Ulysses S. Grant stopped briefly at Fort Monroe to instruct Halleck to send Sheridan's cav. toward N.C.

April 23

Ulysses S. Grant at Beaufort, N.C.

April 24

Ulysses S. Grant reached Raleigh, N.C, and conferred with Sherman.

April 26

Ulysses S. Grant approved Sherman's second surrender agreement with Johnston containing the same terms granted to Lee.

April 29

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington returning from his trip to N.C. He informed Julia Dent Grant that their home in Philadelphia was ready for occupancy.

April 30

Ulysses S. Grant directed that special precautions be taken along the Mississippi River to prevent C.S.A. President Jefferson Davis from escaping into the West.

May 1

Ulysses S. Grant at hd. qrs. in Washington, D.C.

May 2

Ulysses S. Grant at Burlington, N.J.

May 3-5

Ulysses S. Grant at his Philadelphia home.

May 4

C.S.A. Gen. Richard Taylor surrendered troops in the Dept. of Ala., Miss., and East La. on the same terms given at Appomattox.

Abraham Lincoln buried at Springfield, Ill.

May 6

Ulysses S. Grant asserted that Robert E. Lee should be granted amnesty.

May 7

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the arrest of Robert M. T. Hunter and John A. Campbell. The following day he ordered the arrest of Zebulon B. Vance.

May 9

Ulysses S. Grant informed Julia Dent Grant that he could not leave Washington for Philadelphia because of the press of business.

May 10

C.S.A. President Jefferson Davis captured in Ga. by forces commanded by Bvt. Maj. Gen. James H. Wilson, and President Andrew Johnson issued a proclamation declaring that armed resistance had practically ended.

May 12

Ulysses S. Grant testified before the military commission trying the conspirators in the assassination of Lincoln.

May 14-15

Ulysses S. Grant, ill at Philadelphia, distressed by his inability to return to hd. qrs. "knowing the almost absolute necessity of my presence in Washington... "

May 17

Ulysses S. Grant assigned Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to command Tex. and La. to arrange for final surrender of C.S.A. forces and to prepare to exert pressure on the French in Mexico.

May 18

Ulysses S. Grant testified before the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, praising Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton for his wartime support.

Ulysses S. Grant favored allowing former C.S.A. soldiers to return to their homes in northern states and also suggested that they be allowed to join the U.S. Army. He wanted to release military prisoners quickly so that they could get home in time to plant crops.

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. Edward R. S. Canby to send a substantial military force to the Rio Grande to be commanded by Sheridan and also arranged to send the 25th Army Corps from Va. to Tex.

Ulysses S. Grant accepted Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck's offer to use his home in Georgetown, D.C.

May 21

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Maj. Gen. Frederick Steele concerning his role in the expedition to Tex. and directed Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas to send the 4th Army Corps from Tenn. to Tex.

May 22

Ulysses S. Grant directed Steele to prevent the Ala. legislature from meeting.

Johnson removed trade restrictions with the South excluding Tex.

May 23

Ulysses S. Grant attended the grand review of the Army of the Potomac and the following day attended the review of Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's army.

May 26

The C.S.A. Army of Trans-Mississippi surrendered, the last significant force to do so.

May 28-29

Ulysses S. Grant directed Canby and Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield to expedite cotton shipments to the North.

May 29

Johnson issued an Amnesty Proclamation.

May 31

Ulysses S. Grant recommended the gradual release of all C.S.A. prisoners captured in battle and also the release of all civilian prisoners.

June 2

Ulysses S. Grant issued General Orders No. 108 praising soldiers of the U.S.

Ulysses S. Grant suggested reorganization of army commands; Johnson issued the order on June 27.

Ulysses S. Grant recommended that free trade with the South be opened, renewing his application on June 19.

June 8

Ulysses S. Grant visited West Point.

June 10-12

Ulysses S. Grant attended a Chicago fair to benefit disabled soldiers and sailors.

June 15

Ulysses S. Grant approved Indian policies of Maj. Gen. John Pope and sent reinforcements to Ark.

June 15

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Sheridan to demand that the French return all C.S.A. arms and munitions taken into Mexico. Ulysses S. Grant had originally wanted Sheridan to take the arms by force if necessary, but Secretary of State William H. Seward secured modification of Ulysses S. Grant's instructions.

June 16—20

Ulysses S. Grant protected Lee from prosecution for treason.

June 19

Ulysses S. Grant advised Johnson to pursue an aggressive policy against the French in Mexico.

June 20

Ulysses S. Grant began writing his report of operations during the last year of the Civil War, completing his draft around July 16

The report was published in Dec.

June 23

Johnson terminated the blockade of the South.

June 23-25

Ulysses S. Grant at Philadelphia.

July 1

Ulysses S. Grant directed Sheridan to prepare for "active service."

July 3-5

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to Albany, N.Y., to attend a July 4 celebration.

July 7

Four of the eight persons convicted of conspiring to assassinate Lincoln executed at Washington.

July 10

Ulysses S. Grant reported that two-thirds of the vol. army had been mustered out and recommended that most vol. gens, also be mustered out.

July 13

Ulysses S. Grant directed Sheridan to go to the Rio Grande to report on affairs.

July 15

Ulysses S. Grant advised Johnson to send a U.S. commander to Mexico to fight against the French.

July 17

Ulysses S. Grant directed Thomas and Maj. Gen. George G. Meade to reduce to a minimum the troops occupying the South.

July 20

Ulysses S. Grant recommended naming Bvt. Col. Ely S. Parker to a commission to negotiate with Indian tribes.

July 24

Ulysses S. Grant left Washington for an extended summer tour.

July 25-27

Ulysses S. Grant, at West Point, arranged for Schofield to go to Mexico to command troops. Seward, however, diverted Schofield to France to represent U.S. military views to the French.

July 27-28

Ulysses S. Grant at Saratoga, N.Y.

July 29-August 1

Ulysses S. Grant at Boston, then traveled through Maine.

August 5-11

Ulysses S. Grant visited Canada at the invitation of British Maj. Gen. Charles Hastings Doyle. While in Montreal, Aug. 8, he requested amnesty for Montrose A. Pallen and Daniel M. Frost, both former residents of St. Louis.

August 9

Ulysses S. Grant at Niagara Falls.

August 12-14

Ulysses S. Grant at Detroit.

August 13

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Sheridan to keep up pressure along the Rio Grande frontier.

August 16-18

Ulysses S. Grant at Chicago.

August 18

Ulysses S. Grant welcomed home to Galena by an enormous crowd and presented a house by leading citizens.

August 19

Ulysses S. Grant recommended that paroled prisoners be allowed to leave the U.S. not to return without permission.

August 23

Ulysses S. Grant at Dubuque, Iowa.

August 24-28

Ulysses S. Grant on excursion to St. Paul, Minn.

September 4

Ulysses S. Grant at Milwaukee.

September 5

Ulysses S. Grant attended fair in Chicago.

September 6

Ulysses S. Grant directed Sheridan to reduce his forces to a minimum except in Tex.

September 8

Ulysses S. Grant informed Johnson of his conviction that "nonintervention in Mexican affairs will lead to an expensive and bloody war... "

September 10

Ulysses S. Grant arranged to meet with Sherman in St. Louis.

September 12

Ulysses S. Grant at Springfield, Ill.

September 13-22

Ulysses S. Grant at St. Louis.

September 23-October 2

Ulysses S. Grant at Cincinnati making side trips to Covington, Ky., Indianapolis, Ind., and Batavia, Bethel, and Georgetown, Ohio.

October 3

Ulysses S. Grant at Columbus, Ohio.

October 4

Ulysses S. Grant at Pittsburgh, Pa.

October 6

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington.

October 14

Ulysses S. Grant reinforced Pope.

October 18

Ulysses S. Grant sent staff officer to Ky. to investigate political affairs.

October 20

Ulysses S. Grant made suggestions to Stanton concerning reorganization of the U.S. Army, making additional recommendations on November 3.

November 3

Ulysses S. Grant arranged to rent his Philadelphia house after purchasing a house in Washington.

November 6

Ulysses S. Grant defended the U.S. Army against French accusations of unneutral behavior along the Rio Grande.

November 7

Ulysses S. Grant recommended amnesty for James Longstreet.

November 10

Ulysses S. Grant supported survey of the Isthmus of Panama to locate the best route to construct an American-controlled canal.

November 13

Ulysses S. Grant directed Halleck, commanding U.S. troops in Calif., to revoke an order preventing arms and munitions from passing into Mexico.

November 13-21

Ulysses S. Grant in New York City attended a reception in his honor at the Fifth Avenue Hotel on November 20.

November 26

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord to prevent Irish nationalists, Fenians, from invading Canada.

November 27-December 11

At Johnson's request, Ulysses S. Grant made a tour of the South, stopping at Richmond, Raleigh, Wilmington, Charleston, Hilton Head, Savannah, Augusta, Atlanta, and returning via Knoxville and Lynchburg.

December 16

Ulysses S. Grant arranged for Matias Romero, Mexican minister, to communicate with his forces using the U.S. military telegraph.

December 18

Ulysses S. Grant reported to Johnson on his Southern tour.

The Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, abolishing slavery, declared in effect.

Ulysses S. Grant submitted recommendations to the House of Representatives concerning the reorganization of the U.S. Army.

December 30

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Meade and Sheridan to reduce further remaining vol. forces.

January 2-4

Ulysses S. Grant attended the wedding of Bvt. Maj. Gen. James H. Wilson at Wilmington, Del.

January 6

Ulysses S. Grant acknowledged receipt of a library presented by citizens of Boston. January 9. Ulysses S. Grant recommended that arms be sold to an agent of the Mexicans fighting against the French.

January 9

Ulysses S. Grant opposed arming militia in the South.

January 12

Ulysses S. Grant issued General Orders No. 3 permitting military and civil officers of the U.S. and other loyal persons in the South to transfer cases from local to federal courts.

Ulysses S. Grant submitted recommendations to U.S. Senator Henry Wilson concerning reorganization of the U.S. Army.

January 17

Ulysses S. Grant listened to speeches on Reconstruction in the Senate.

January 25

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to withdraw troops from Mexico.

January 29

Ulysses S. Grant informed Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton of his concerns about their respective roles in the chain of command. He met with Stanton the following day without resolving the issue.

February 1

Ulysses S. Grant consulted with Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, and Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas who had been ordered to Washington concerning reorganization of the U.S. Army.

February 9

Ulysses S. Grant recommended to President Andrew Johnson that U.S. troops remain in Miss.

February 13

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the suppression of the Richmond Examiner.

February 16

Ulysses S. Grant defended army actions in crossing the Rio Grande.

February 17

Ulysses S. Grant compiled a list of outrages committed against Negroes in the South; on March 14, he submitted a supplemental list.

Ulysses S. Grant acknowledged a gift of $105,000 from citizens of New York City.

February 21-27

Ulysses S. Grant visited New York City; on Feb. 22, he accepted a portrait of Bvt. Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott at the Union League Club.

February 28

Ulysses S. Grant wanted to extend General Orders No. 3, Jan. 12, to include Ky. and Mo.

March 1

Ulysses S. Grant applied to Johnson for a United States Military Academy appointment for his son Frederick Dent Grant, who became a cadet as of July 1.

March 3

Ulysses S. Grant discussed the sale of arms to Mexico with Johnson, disagreeing with Secretary of State William H. Seward's view that such sales were a violation of neutrality.

March 5-7

Ulysses S. Grant took Fred to board at West Point so that he could prepare for the entrance examinations.

March 6

Bvt. Col. Theodore S. Bowers, Ulysses S. Grant's adjt. and friend, killed in a railroad accident at Garrison Station, N.Y. Bowers had accompanied Ulysses S. Grant and Fred to West Point.

March 8

Ulysses S. Grant went to West Point to attend Bowers's funeral, and returned to Washington the following morning.

March 12

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Meade to prevent Fenians from invading Canada.

March 14

Ulysses S. Grant praised Maj. Gen. John Pope's report on Indian affairs and recommended that the Bureau of Indian Affairs be transferred from the Dept. of the Interior to the War Dept.

March 24

Ulysses S. Grant informed Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield in Paris of his regret that the French had not been driven out of Mexico as the last act of the Civil War.

March 28

Ulysses S. Grant again recommended that the U.S. furnish arms to Mexicans.

April 2

Johnson issued a proclamation declaring an end to the insurrection except in Tex.

April 3

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. Alfred H. Terry to close bars in Richmond to prevent trouble during the Negro celebration of the fall of the city.

April 6

Ulysses S. Grant held a reception with guests including Johnson, former C.S.A. Vice President Alexander H. Stephens, and U.S. Representative Thaddeus Stevens.

April 9

Congress passed Civil Rights Bill over Johnson's veto.

April 17

Ulysses S. Grant at Philadelphia.

April 19

Ulysses S. Grant recommended the transfer of Maj. Gen. Edward R. S. Canby from New Orleans because of a quarrel with Sheridan.

April 21—25

Ulysses S. Grant visited his sister-in-law in Richmond.

April 27

Ulysses S. Grant approved seizure of Fenian arms and munitions.

Ulysses S. Grant directed Maj. Gen. John G. Foster to protect from civil suits individuals who held title to lands in Fla. gained from U.S. tax sales.

May 1

Ulysses S. Grant's proposal to supply arms to Mexicans rejected at cabinet meeting.

Riot at Memphis with many Negroes killed.

May 9

Ulysses S. Grant and U.S. Representative Elihu B. Washburne at Baltimore.

May 14

Ulysses S. Grant directed Meade to seize arms intended for Fenian use in Canada.

May 16

Ulysses S. Grant recommended Maj. Gen. George A. Custer for a position with the Mexican forces fighting the French.

May 19

Ulysses S. Grant directed Sheridan to facilitate delivery of an arms shipment purchased privately by the Mexicans.

May 29

Scott died at West Point; Ulysses S. Grant attended the funeral on June 1.

May 31

Fenians battled Canadian militia.

June 2

Ulysses S. Grant at Buffalo issued orders concerning Fenian activities.

June 4

Ulysses S. Grant visited J. Russell Jones at Chicago.

June 5-15

Ulysses S. Grant at St. Louis attended to legal business concerning his property.

June 6

Johnson issued neutrality proclamation to prevent Fenian raids on Canada.

June 16

Fourteenth Amendment submitted to the states for ratification.

June 16-17

Ulysses S. Grant at Louisville consulted with Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis.

June 19

Ulysses S. Grant met Sherman at Cincinnati and visited his parents at Covington.

June 21

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington.

July 2

Ulysses S. Grant recommended publishing an order granting amnesty to deserters who returned to the U.S. Army by Aug. 15

July 4

Ulysses S. Grant attended celebration in Philadelphia.

July 6

Ulysses S. Grant issued General Orders No. 44 directing U.S. Army officers in the South to arrest Southerners for crimes when local civil authorities refused to act.

July 7

Ulysses S. Grant endorsed the idea of building a canal across Central America.

July 8-17

Ulysses S. Grant at West Point to visit Fred.

July 16

Congress passed New Freedmen's Bureau Bill over Johnson's veto.

July 18

Ulysses S. Grant directed Thomas not to interfere with civil affairs in Tenn.

Ulysses S. Grant asked Stanton to approve Sheridan's request to sell or give arms to Mexicans; on July 20 the cabinet again rejected the proposal.

July 25

Ulysses S. Grant confirmed by Senate as gen.

July 28

Ulysses S. Grant recommended suspending an order prohibiting sale of surplus weapons to permit arms to go to Mexico.

Johnson signed the bill reorganizing the army.

July 30

Ulysses S. Grant arranged to have naval vessels patrol the Mexican Pacific Coast and the mouth of the Rio Grande.

Rioting erupted in New Orleans with many Negroes killed.

July 31

Sherman arrived in Washington to accept his promotion to Lt. Gen.

August 3

Ulysses S. Grant began to recommend appointments to the new army, a process that consumed much of his time during the following year.

August 18

Johnson directed Ulysses S. Grant to attend ceremony at White House welcoming a delegation from the Philadelphia Union Convention.

August 20

Johnson issued proclamation declaring insurrection ended in Tex.

August 28-September 17

Ulysses S. Grant reluctantly accompanied Johnson on the "Swing Around the Circle," growing disgusted with Johnson's behavior at public meetings.

September 4

Ulysses S. Grant at Detroit after leaving Johnson's party the day before at Cleveland.

September 9

At St. Louis, Ulysses S. Grant wrote to his wife that Johnson's tour was a "National disgrace."

September 11

Ulysses S. Grant at Cincinnati annoyed by public demonstration in his favor.

September 22

Ulysses S. Grant ordered all surplus arms quietly removed from Southern posts in case of a renewal of rebellion.

September 24

Ulysses S. Grant ordered investigation of reports of secret military organizations in Tenn.

September 25-29

Ulysses S. Grant visited New York City and West Point.

October 8

Ulysses S. Grant supported Sheridan's refusal to allow Tex. Authorities to raise vols. ostensibly to fight Indians.

October 12

Ulysses S. Grant revealed to Sheridan his concern that Johnson might provoke a renewal of the rebellion.

October 15

Ulysses S. Grant arranged to negotiate claims against his property in St. Louis.

October 17

Ulysses S. Grant privately admitted his growing estrangement from Johnson and he refused Johnson's request to accompany a diplomatic mission to Mexico.

October 18

Ulysses S. Grant informed Sherman of his belief that Johnson wanted Sherman in Washington "either as Act. Sec. of War or in some other way."

October 20

Johnson directed Ulysses S. Grant to order Sherman to Washington and discussed with Ulysses S. Grant his concern about possible electoral violence in Baltimore.

October 21

Ulysses S. Grant again refused Johnson's request to accompany the mission to Mexico.

October 23

Ulysses S. Grant decided not to go to a wedding at Galena because of the situation in Washington, and he again refused Johnson's request to go to Mexico, this time at a cabinet meeting.

October 27

Ulysses S. Grant refused a request through Stanton that he go on the Mexican mission.

October 30

Stanton issued orders directing Sherman to accompany the Mexican mission in place of Ulysses S. Grant.

November 1

Ulysses S. Grant observed the situation at Baltimore.

November 2

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Canby to prepare troops for trouble in Baltimore.

November 4-5

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Baltimore and negotiated an agreement to keep the peace during the election, which occurred the following day without incident.

November 21

Ulysses S. Grant submitted his annual report and again recommended that the Bureau of Indian Affairs be transferred to the War Dept.

November 28-30

U.S. forces briefly occupied Matamoras, Mexico.

December 1

Ulysses S. Grant agreed that Sheridan should go to the Rio Grande.

December 6

Ulysses S. Grant encouraged Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord to work for the passage of pending constitutional amendments by Ark.

December 11-22

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to St. Louis to pursue a lawsuit concerning his St. Louis property.

December 17

U.S. Supreme Court decided ex parte Milligan, restricting power of military to try civilians.

December 20

Sherman arrived at New Orleans after an unsuccessful trip to Mexico.

December 21

Sioux defeated U.S. forces under Capt. William J. Fetterman near Fort Philip Kearny, Dakota Territory. On Dec. 31, Ulysses S. Grant reinforced Sherman.

January 4

At a cabinet meeting, Ulysses S. Grant agreed with President Andrew Johnson's decision to veto a D.C. suffrage bill that enfranchised blacks and disfranchised disloyal men.

January 14

Ulysses S. Grant inquired about the investigation of the military disaster at Fort Phil Kearny, Dakota Territory.

January 15

Ulysses S. Grant commented favorably on a proposal of Lieutenant General William T. Sherman to keep Indians north of the Platte River, south of the Arkansas River.

January 29

Ulysses S. Grant recommended the imposition of martial law in Tex.

February 1

Ulysses S. Grant renewed his recommendation that the Bureau of Indian Affairs be transferred from the Dept. of the Interior to the War Dept.

February 8

Ulysses S. Grant reported violations of the Civil Rights Act in the South.Sherman arrived at New Orleans after an unsuccessful trip to Mexico.Ulysses S. Grant attended a meeting of the trustees of the Peabody Education Fund.

March 2

By the Tenure of Office Act, Congress limited Johnson's power to remove civilian officials, seeking to protect Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. Legislation of the same day required that military orders be issued by Ulysses S. Grant as gen. in chief, and protected him from removal or reassignment.Sherman arrived at New Orleans after an unsuccessful trip to Mexico.Congress passed legislation, later known as the First Reconstruction Act, dividing ten former C.S.A. states (excluding Tenn.) into five military districts commanded by officers directed to call conventions to write new constitutions.

March 4

Congress passed the First Reconstruction Act over Johnson's veto. Ulysses S. Grant considered the veto message "ridiculous."

March 11

After consultation with Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant appointed commanders for the military districts: First (Va.), Bvt. Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield; Second (N.C. and S.C.), Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles; Third (Ala., Ga., and Fla.), Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas; Fourth (Ark. and Miss.), Bvt. Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord; Fifth (La. and Tex.), Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan.

March 15

When Thomas objected to this new assignment, Ulysses S. Grant left him in command of the Dept. of the Cumberland and assigned Bvt. Maj. Gen. John Pope to command the Third Military District. On April 1, Pope assumed command at Montgomery, Ala.

March 19

In New York City, Ulysses S. Grant attended a meeting of the Peabody trustees.

March 23

Second Reconstruction Act extended power of military governors to supervise state election processes.

March 24

Ulysses S. Grant wrote a friend that he had "given up the idea of going to Mo. this spring."

April 5

Ulysses S. Grant cautioned Sheridan about removing government officials lest he himself be removed. On the same day, however, Ulysses S. Grant wrote that Sheridan "makes no mistakes."

April 27

Ulysses S. Grant's forty-fifth birthday.

April 29

Ulysses S. Grant returned from a "very pleasant week" in Philadelphia.

Ulysses S. Grant expressed good wishes for reestablishment of the College of William and Mary.

May 29

Ulysses S. Grant made plans to take possession of Alaska.

June 7

Ulysses S. Grant commented on Sheridan's removal of Governor J. Madison Wells of La.

June 17

Ulysses S. Grant presented diplomas to graduates at West Point.

June 19

Execution of the Emperor Maximilian marked the final chapter of the French occupation of Mexico.

June 20

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Gettysburg and toured the battlefield the next morning.

June 26

Ulysses S. Grant testified briefly at the trial of John H. Surratt, charged as a conspirator in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

July 11

Ulysses S. Grant at West Point.

July 18

Ulysses S. Grant testified before the Judiciary Committee, U.S. House of Representatives, then considering the impeachment of Johnson. Ulysses S. Grant testified again on July 20.

July 19

Third Reconstruction Act affirmed the independence of military district commanders from executive control.

July 20

Ulysses S. Grant left Washington for New York City, on his way to Long Branch, N.J.

July 22

Stanton ordered Ulysses S. Grant to Nashville, Thomas to Memphis, to prevent anticipated violence at elections. On July 23, Ulysses S. Grant responded that he saw "no need" to go to Nashville.

July 25

Ulysses S. Grant recommended that Sherman, Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, and Bvt. Maj. Gen. Alfred H. Terry represent the army among the commissioners negotiating with Indians.

August 1

Ulysses S. Grant urged Johnson not to remove Stanton.

August 5

Johnson asked Stanton to resign, and Stanton refused.

August 11

Ulysses S. Grant visited Stanton at home to inform him that he would be suspended the next day.

August 12

Johnson suspended Stanton from office and appointed Ulysses S. Grant secretary of war ad interim.

Ulysses S. Grant made further plans for the transfer of Alaska.

August 17

In response to Johnson's orders, Ulysses S. Grant assigned Thomas to command the Fifth Military District, Sheridan to command the Dept. of the Mo., and Hancock to command the Dept. of the Cumberland.

August 21

Ulysses S. Grant sent nurses to New Orleans in response to a yellow fever epidemic.

August 26

Johnson issued orders replacing Sickles in command of the Second Military District with Bvt. Maj. Gen. Edward R. S. Canby, who assumed command on September 5.

Johnson ordered Sheridan removed from the Fifth Military District. Hancock replaced him because Thomas's health prevented him from taking the assignment.

September 13

Ulysses S. Grant recommended against reopening the case of Fitz John Porter.

September 16

With Hancock's arrival in New Orleans delayed by the yellow fever epidemic, Bvt. Maj. Gen. Joseph A. Mower assumed temporary command of the Fifth Military District.

October 18

U.S. acquisition of Alaska completed.

November 5

Convention convened in Ala., the first under the Reconstruction Acts.

November 29

Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock assumed command of the Fifth Military District.

December 7

House of Representatives voted 57—108 against the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson.

December 12

Johnson asked the Senate to approve the suspension of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton.

December 28

Ulysses S. Grant issued orders replacing Bvt. Maj. Gen. John Pope in command of the Third Military District with Maj. Gen. George G. Meade.

Ulysses S. Grant exchanged the commands of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord, Fourth Military District, and Bvt. Maj. Gen. Irvin McDowell, Dept. of Calif. Before McDowell's arrival in June, 1868, Bvt. Maj. Gen. Alvan C. Gillem commanded the Fourth Military District.

January 8

Ulysses S. Grant asked U.S. Senator Lyman Trumbull of Ill. to represent Ord in Ex Parte McCardle.

January 11

Ulysses S. Grant and Johnson discussed the consequences if the Senate failed to approve Stanton's removal. Johnson believed that Ulysses S. Grant promised to remain in office until Johnson could find another secretary of war.

January 12

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with Lieutenant General William T. Sherman about War Dept. strategy; as a result, the next day Sherman recommended to Johnson that Jacob D. Cox of Ohio be appointed secretary of war.

January 13

Senate voted 35—6 to refuse to concur in the suspension of Stanton.

Meade removed Governor Charles J. Jenkins of Ga. And replaced him with Bvt. Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Ruger.

January 13

Ulysses S. Grant attended a reception at the White House but did not discuss with Johnson his plans to resign the War Dept.

January 14

Ulysses S. Grant resigned as secretary of war ad interim and handed the keys to the office to Bvt. Maj. Gen. Edward D. Townsend, act. adjt. gen., who then handed them to Stanton.

At cabinet meeting, Johnson berated Ulysses S. Grant for surrendering War Dept.

January 15

Ulysses S. Grant and Sherman met Johnson to discuss charges that Ulysses S. Grant had acted improperly in leaving the War Dept.

January 19

Visiting Stanton to recommend that he resign, Ulysses S. Grant realized that this would "incur further his displeasure" and "did not directly suggest it to him."

Johnson verbally ordered Ulysses S. Grant to disobey any orders from Stanton not approved by Johnson. On Jan. 29, at Ulysses S. Grant's insistence, Johnson repeated these orders in writing.

January 20

Ulysses S. Grant visited Richmond.

February 6

Johnson ordered Sherman from St. Louis to Washington, then withdrew the order.

February 8

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Hancock to suspend an order removing nine members of the New Orleans City Council.

February 12

Johnson again ordered Sherman to Washington.

February 19

Johnson withdrew his order to Sherman to come to Washington after Sherman protested vehemently.

February 21

Johnson again suspended Stanton as secretary of war, replacing him with Bvt. Maj. Gen. Lorenzo Thomas, adjt. gen.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the reinstatement of nine members of the New Orleans City Council removed by Hancock.

February 24

Through passing a resolution offered by John Covode, the House of Representatives began the process of impeaching Johnson.

March 2

Ulysses S. Grant instructed Sherman to prepare to abandon forts Phil Kearny, Reno, Fetterman and C. F. Smith to avert hostilities with Indians.

House of Representatives adopted nine articles of impeachment, two more the next day.

March 10

Ulysses S. Grant wrote Lewis Wallace a conciliatory letter about his march to Shiloh.

March 13

Ulysses S. Grant forwarded to Johnson complaints about the Ku Klux Klan in Tenn.

March 14

Hancock removed from command of the Fifth Military District and replaced by Bvt. Maj. Gen. Robert C. Buchanan.

March 27

Hancock assigned to command the Military Div. of the Atlantic.

March 30

Commencement of Johnson's impeachment trial.

April 2

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Meade to investigate the murder of George W. Ashburn, member of the Ga. convention.

April 4

Bvt. Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield appointed Henry H. Wells as governor of Va.

April 25

Ulysses S. Grant urged Schofield to decline nomination as secretary of war. Schofield replied the next day that the advice had arrived too late.

April 30

Ulysses S. Grant recommended restoration of political rights to former C.S.A. Gen. James Longstreet.

May 8

Ulysses S. Grant forwarded a list of officeholders in Tex. who should be removed.

May 11

Key vote in the impeachment trial fell one vote short of conviction.

May 15

"Impeachment is likely to fail," Ulysses S. Grant reported.

May 21

National Union Republican Convention nominated Ulysses S. Grant for president.

May 26

Following the adjournment of the impeachment trial, Stanton resigned.

May 29

Ulysses S. Grant formally accepted nomination for president.

Schofield confirmed as secretary of war.

June 4

McDowell assumed command of the Fourth Military District.

June 15

McDowell removed Governor Benjamin G. Humphreys of Miss, and appointed Bvt. Maj. Gen. Adelbert Ames.

June 19

Ulysses S. Grant wrote a letter intended to end his quarrel with U.S. Representative Benjamin F. Butler of Mass.

June 22

Ark. readmitted to Congress.

June 25

Ala., Fla., Ga., La., N.C. and S.C. readmitted to Congress.

June 30

Ulysses S. Grant left Washington for St. Louis.

July 4

Democratic party nominated Horatio Seymour for president and Francis P. Blair, Jr., for vice president.

July 7

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in St. Louis eight days after leaving Washington, D.C.

July 16

Due to a strike by railroad engineers, Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Fort Leavenworth a day later than anticipated.

July 18

Ulysses S. Grant, Lt. Gen. William T. Sherman, and Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan began a two-week tour of the West that included stops at Denver; Benton, Dakota Territory; and Omaha.

Ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

August 1

Ulysses S. Grant recommended removal of civil officers in Miss, unable to take the oath prescribed by Congress and approved a request to appoint blacks to offices in Va.

August 7

Ulysses S. Grant spoke briefly to a welcoming crowd at Galena, where he resided for most of the next three months.

August 27

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Dent Grant left Galena to visit Orvil L. Grant in Chicago. On Aug. 29, Ulysses S. Grant addressed a crowd gathered at his brother's home.

September 9

Ulysses S. Grant spoke briefly at the dedication of a normal school in Platteville, Wis.

September 26

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Chicago, accompanied by Bvt. Brig. Gen. Adam Badeau, for a two-day visit with Orvil Grant.

October 1

Ulysses S. Grant went from Galena to his farm near St. Louis.

October 5

At Springfield, Ill., Ulysses S. Grant attended the laying of the cornerstone of the Ill. State House.

October 7

Ulysses S. Grant attended the meeting of the U.S. Indian Commission at Chicago and returned the next day to Galena.

October 10

President Andrew Johnson directed Ulysses S. Grant to issue General Orders No. 82 to regulate elections in southern states.

October 14

Election returns reporting Republican victories in Ohio, Pa., and Ind. reached Ulysses S. Grant at Elihu B. Washburne's home in Galena.

November 3

Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Coif ax won election as president and vice president.

November 4

Ulysses S. Grant delivered a short speech in Galena acknowledging his electoral victory.

November 5

Ulysses S. Grant left Galena by train for Washington, D.C., arriving on November 7.

November 13

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant, en route to USMA to visit their son, stayed overnight in New York City.

November 21

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C., following a day in Philadelphia.

November 24

Ulysses S. Grant recommended transferring the Indian Bureau from the Dept. of the Interior to the War Dept. and maintaining existing troop levels.

November 30

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at the annual dinner of the St. Andrew's Society, Philadelphia.

December 2

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Boston and was declared a guest of the city. During his stay he visited Harvard College and the manufacturing centers of Waltham and Lowell.

December 6

Ulysses S. Grant returned to New York City after spending the previous day in Providence visiting Governor Ambrose E. Burnside of R.I.

December 8

Ulysses S. Grant attended the wedding of Julia Kean Fish, the daughter of Hamilton Fish.

In the evening, Ulysses S. Grant spoke at a Union League Club dinner.

December 11

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C.

December 15

In Chicago, Ulysses S. Grant addressed a reunion of former officers of the Army of the Tennessee.

December 18

On his return trip to Washington, D.C, Ulysses S. Grant visited his father, Jesse Root Grant, at Covington, Ky.

December 31

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Girard College, Philadelphia, a school founded for the instruction of orphans.

January 4

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C., from Philadelphia.

January 12

Suffering a severe headache, Ulysses S. Grant canceled all appointments.

January 19

Ulysses S. Grant met a committee of the National Convention of Colored Men.

January 21

Ulysses S. Grant attended a meeting of the trustees of the Peabody Education Fund in Baltimore and remained there until Jan. 23.

February 3

Ulysses S. Grant attempted to settle a dispute with Sayles J. Bowen involving the purchase of Ulysses S. Grant's Washington, D.C., home by offering to make good personally any loss Bowen sustained.

February 4

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant took rooms at the Fifth Avenue Hotel in New York City and departed for Philadelphia on Feb. 8.

February 10

Congress formally declared Ulysses S. Grant the winner of the presidency. On Feb. 13, a congressional delegation presented a certificate of election.

February 19

Businessmen in New York City agreed to purchase Ulysses S. Grant's house for $65,000 and transfer the property to Sherman. On Feb. 26, Ulysses S. Grant transferred the deed to Sherman.

February 27

Congress proposed the Fifteenth Amendment to the U.S.Constitution.

March 4

Ulysses S. Grant inaugurated as eighteenth president. Congress convened. Horace Porter, Frederick T. Dent, and Orville E. Babcock became private secretaries to Ulysses S. Grant.

March 5

Sherman assumed command of the U.S. Army, replacing Ulysses S. Grant. Sheridan replaced Sherman as commander, Division of the Mo. Ulysses S. Grant nominated Washburne as secretary of state, Alexander T. Stewart as secretary of the treasury, Adolph E. Borie as secretary of the navy, Jacob D. Cox as secretary of the interior, Ebenezer R. Hoar as attorney gen., and John A. J. Creswell as postmaster gen.

March 6

Ulysses S. Grant asked the Senate to pass a joint resolution exempting Stewart from the 1789 law prohibiting those engaged in trade or commerce from holding office in the Treasury Dept.

March 9

Stewart withdrew his acceptance of a cabinet post.

March 10

Washburne resigned as secretary of state. Ulysses S. Grant tendered the office to Hamilton Fish.

March 11

Secretary of War John M. Schofield resigned. Ulysses S. Grant nominated Fish as secretary of state, John A. Rawlins as secretary of war, George S. Boutwell as secretary of the treasury, and Washburne as minister to France.

March 12

After first declining Ulysses S. Grant's nomination, Fish agreed to become secretary of state.

March 15

Ulysses S. Grant met representatives of the Cherokees, Choctaws, Creeks, and Chickasaws and assured them of his goodwill.

March 18

Ulysses S. Grant's family moved into the White House following repairs and the installation of new wallpaper and carpets.

March 19

Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill securing equal rights for blacks in Washington, D.C.

March 30

Recovered from facial neuralgia and exhaustion, Ulysses S. Grant received visitors for the first time in three days.

April 2

Ulysses S. Grant held a private interview with Lt. Governor Oscar J. Dunn of La., the first prominent black public official to visit the White House.

April 7

Ulysses S. Grant asked Congress to authorize elections in Va. And Miss, to ratify state constitutions.

April 10

Congress adjourned after creating the Board of Indian Commissioners and passing the Judiciary Act to increase the number of U.S. Supreme Court justices from seven to nine.

April 12

The Senate convened a special session in accordance with Ulysses S. Grant's proclamation of April 8.

April 13

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Ely S. Parker as commissioner of Indian Affairs.

April 20

Ulysses S. Grant met Rabbi H. Z. Sneersohn, who discussed the plight of Jews in Palestine.

April 21

Ulysses S. Grant met John W. Forney and others traveling through the South to promote the investment of northern capital.

April 29

Traveling by U.S. Navy steamer, Ulysses S. Grant and an excursion party visited Mount Vernon and George Washington's tomb.

May 1

Ulysses S. Grant met privately with Robert E. Lee.

May 10

The Union Pacific and Central Pacific Railroads completed the first transcontinental track.

May 19

Ulysses S. Grant offered George H. Stuart appointment as secretary of the navy.

Ulysses S. Grant issued a proclamation clarifying the eight-hour-day law for government employees by prohibiting any reduction in wages to compensate for reduced hours.

May 25

Ulysses S. Grant visited the U.S. Naval Academy and returned the next day.

May 29

Ulysses S. Grant participated in a memorial service for Union soldiers at Arlington Cemetery.

June 4

Ulysses S. Grant distributed diplomas to U.S. Naval Academy graduates.

June 9

Ulysses S. Grant, family members, and Rawlins left Washington, D.C., for USMA and the Boston Peace Jubilee.

June 16

Ulysses S. Grant spoke in Boston and toured the city.

June 21

Ulysses S. Grant left New York City for Washington, D.C.

June 25

Borie resigned as secretary of the navy. On the same day, George M. Robeson assumed this office.

June 30

Ulysses S. Grant visited Baltimore and the machine shops of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad as the guest of John W. Garrett.

July 1

Ulysses S. Grant distributed diplomas and awards at the Georgetown College commencement but avoided meeting Andrew Johnson, whose son was among the graduates.

July 13

Ulysses S. Grant assigned Babcock as special agent to investigate affairs in Santo Domingo and designated November 30 for the ratification vote on the proposed Miss, state constitution. On July 15, Ulysses S. Grant designated November 30 for a similar vote in Tex.

July 15

Ulysses S. Grant and family left for Long Branch, N.J., arriving on July 19 after stopping at Fort Monroe, Va., and Cape May, N.J.

July 22

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Grant, and their daughter, Nellie, visited New York City.

July 26

Ulysses S. Grant presided over a gala evening ball and reception at the Stetson House, Long Branch.

August 3

Ulysses S. Grant announced that he had purchased a seaside summer home in Long Branch. Ulysses S. Grant left Long Branch by steamer to visit Wall Street, USMA, and Fish at his home in Garrison, N.Y.

August 7

Ulysses S. Grant attended a parade and banquet in his honor at Newburg, N.Y.

August 10

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C, for a cabinet meeting, while his family remained in New York City.

August 13

Traveling in a car provided by the Erie Railroad, Ulysses S. Grant visited that company's locomotive works at Elmira, N.Y.

August 14

Ulysses S. Grant went to Kane, Pa., and spent the next four days trout fishing and visiting coal and iron mines.

August 19

Ulysses S. Grant stopped briefly in New York City on his way to Newport, R.I.

August 25

Ulysses S. Grant visited manufacturing mills at Manchester, N.H., and attended a reception at Concord.

August 28

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Saratoga, N.Y.

August 31

In Washington, D.C., for a cabinet meeting, Ulysses S. Grant departed the next day for Saratoga, arriving on September 2.

September 3

Ulysses S. Grant gave a reception at the Union Hotel, Saratoga.

September 6

Rawlins died in Washington, D.C., before Ulysses S. Grant could return from Saratoga. On September 7, Ulysses S. Grant contributed $1,000 to the Rawlins Family fund.

September 9

Ulysses S. Grant left Washington, D.C., for New York City after attending Rawlins's funeral and appointing Sherman as temporary secretary of war.

September 14

Ulysses S. Grant spoke briefly in Johnstown and Pittsburgh on his way to Washington, Pa., where, on September 18, he took part in laying the cornerstone of the town hall.

September 24

Gold prices, inflated by speculation, plummeted in a "panic" after Ulysses S. Grant ordered the sale of U.S. government gold, thwarting the market-cornering scheme of Jay Gould and James Fisk but creating enough financial havoc to earn the designation "Black Friday."

October 3

Ulysses S. Grant told the Associated Press that he had done nothing to influence the money markets.

October 5

Abel R. Corbin, Ulysses S. Grant's brother-in-law, denied complicity in the gold panic.

October 13

Ulysses S. Grant named William W. Belknap as secretary of war.

October 14

Ulysses S. Grant spoke briefly at an agricultural fair in Frederick, Md. On Oct. 15, he toured the battlefield at Antietam.

October 19

U.S. naval vessels seized the filibuster ship Hornet at Wilmington, N.C.

October 26

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant left Washington, D.C., to attend the wedding of Anna Simpson and James R. Weaver in Philadelphia.

November 18

Ulysses S. Grant held a Thanksgiving dinner for his staff and their families.

December 6

Ulysses S. Grant submitted his annual message to Congress.

December 11

Ulysses S. Grant addressed a delegation from the predominately black National Labor Convention.

December 14

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Ebenezer R. Hoar as associate justice, U.S. Supreme Court. On Dec. 22, the Senate tabled this nomination.

December 15

Ulysses S. Grant accepted the resignation of Robert C. Grier, associate justice, U.S. Supreme Court, to take effect Feb. 1, 1870.

December 20

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Edwin M. Stanton as associate justice, U.S. Supreme Court. Orville E. Babcock returned from Santo Domingo.

December 22

Congress revoked the statehood of Ga. and required ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment for readmission, a standard subsequently applied to all unreconstructed states.

December 24

Stanton died.


1870s Presidency & Travel

January 10

Ulysses S. Grant submitted to the Senate the Santo Domingo annexation treaty.

January 20

Ulysses S. Grant met a delegation from the Cherokees and Creeks.

January 24

Ulysses S. Grant received Prince Arthur of England at the White House and, on Jan. 26, held a dinner and ball in his honor.

January 26

Congress readmitted Va.

February 3

The Senate rejected Hoar's nomination.

February 7

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Joseph P. Bradley and William Strong as associate justices, U.S. Supreme Court.

February 9

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Jesse Root Grant to continue as postmaster, Covington, Ky.

February 25

Hiram R. Revels of Miss, was seated as the first black U.S. senator two days after Congress readmitted Miss.

March 9

Ulysses S. Grant discussed events in Cuba with U.S. senators and Gen. Manuel Quesada.

March 14

Ulysses S. Grant urged Senate action to ratify the Santo Domingo annexation treaty before its expiration on March 29.

March 23

Ulysses S. Grant issued a special message on the decline of the U.S. merchant marine.

March 24

Meeting with U.S. Representative James H. Platt, Jr., of Va. and Republican members of the Va. legislature, Ulysses S. Grant sustained the actions of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Edward R. S. Canby to prevent riots in the state.

March 29

In a subsequently published interview, Ulysses S. Grant expounded on the advantages of annexing Santo Domingo.

March 30

Ulysses S. Grant marked the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment with a special message to Congress. Congress readmitted Tex.

March 31

Ulysses S. Grant submitted to the Senate a treaty with Colombia for construction of an "Interoceanic canal across the Isthmus of Panama and Darien."

April 8

Ulysses S. Grant attended the funeral of Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas atTroy,N.Y.

April 9

Ulysses S. Grant, Gen. William T. Sherman, Lt. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan, and Maj. Gen. George G. Meade attended a reunion of the Army of the Potomac in Philadelphia.

April 21

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Adam Badeau as consul gen., London.

April 28

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Dent Grant left Washington, D.C., for West Point.

May 1

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant were guests of Abel R. and Virginia Grant Corbin in Elizabeth, N.J.

May 16

Wishing to discuss foreign policy, Ulysses S. Grant convened a special cabinet meeting.

May 17

Ulysses S. Grant advised Attorney Gen. Ebenezer R. Hoar to prevent the Union Pacific Railroad from falling into receivership at the dictum of a territorial judge.

May 24

Ulysses S. Grant issued a proclamation, directed at Fenians, prohibiting armed expeditions against Canada originating in the U.S.

May 31

Ulysses S. Grant submitted to the Senate an agreement stipulating an extension for ratifying the Santo Domingo annexation treaty.

Congress passed a bill known as the Ku Klux Klan, or Enforcement, Act to protect the new constitutional rights of blacks.

June 6

Ulysses S. Grant gave an evening reception for the delegations of Spotted Tail and Red Cloud and the diplomatic corps. He met representatives of Brule and Oglala Sioux on June 2 and 9.

June 9

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Grant, and a party of friends left Washington, D.C., for a fishing trip in Pa., returning on June 13.

June 15

Ulysses S. Grant accepted the resignation of Attorney Gen. Ebenezer R. Hoar. The following day, Ulysses S. Grant nominated Amos T. Akerman as attorney gen.

June 22

Congress established the Dept. of Justice.

June 30

A vote of 28 to 28 in the Senate defeated the Santo Domingo Republic annexation treaty.

July 1

Ulysses S. Grant advocated the removal of John L. Motley as minister to England and suggested Frederick T. Frelinghuysen for the post. On July 27, Frelinghuysen declined this nomination.

July 7

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C., after visiting Conn, since July 2 and speaking at Stamford, New Haven, and Plainfield.

July 20

Ulysses S. Grant ordered a pay increase of $1:50 per month for enlisted naval personnel and appointed Charles F. Hall to command an expedition toward the North Pole.

July 21

Ulysses S. Grant and family went to Long Branch.

July 22

Upon the request of Governor William W. Holden of N.C., Ulysses S. Grant ordered troops to the state to suppress Ku Klux Klan violence.

July 25

Ulysses S. Grant authorized Lt. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to visit Europe.

August 2

To interdict filibustering expeditions, Ulysses S. Grant put troops in San Francisco at the disposal of the U.S. marshal.

August 4

Ulysses S. Grant went to Washington, D.C., for two days.

August 10

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to St. Louis. Ulysses S. Grant stayed at the home of William H. Benton.

August 12

After looking into property matters and considering the purchase of a cemetery plot, Ulysses S. Grant left St. Louis for Chicago.

August 17

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Long Branch after leaving Chicago on Aug. 14.

August 18

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Sherman trying to reconcile differences between him and Secretary of War William W. Belknap over proper command of the army.

August 22

Ulysses S. Grant proclaimed U.S. neutrality in the Franco-Prussian War.

August 23

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant went to Newport, R.I.

August 28

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited West Point.

September 8

Back in Washington, D.C., on account of events in Europe, Ulysses S. Grant declined an invitation to visit U.S. Senator Roscoe Conkling of N.Y. at his home in Utica.

September 9

Ulysses S. Grant received Santiago Perez, Colombian minister, and acknowledged the importance of negotiations related to construction of an interoceanic canal.

September 10

From New York City, Ulysses S. Grant telegraphed Secretary of State Hamilton Fish that U.S. Senator Oliver P. Morton had accepted appointment as minister to England. At Morton's request, Ulysses S. Grant withheld public announcement.

September 14

In response to a formal welcome, Ulysses S. Grant spoke briefly at the Monmouth County Agricultural Fair, Freehold, N.J.

September 26

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant left Long Branch to take Ulysses S. Grant, Jr., to Harvard and Ellen Grant to Miss Porter's School, Farmington, Conn.

September 30

Ulysses S. Grant attended the New York City funeral of Admiral David G. Farragut and dined that evening at the Union League Club.

October 2

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C.

October 4

Ulysses S. Grant asked Governor Marshall Jewell of Conn, to keep Ellen Grant at his home following her withdrawal from school.

October 5

Ulysses S. Grant accepted the resignation of Secretary of the Interior Jacob D. Cox effective upon completion of his annual report.

October 8

Ulysses S. Grant issued a proclamation prohibiting French and German vessels from using U.S. ports for any military purpose.

October 12

After several weeks consideration, Ulysses S. Grant simultaneously pardoned Fenians then in U.S. custody and issued a proclamation warning against violations of U.S. sovereignty.

October 20

Ulysses S. Grant privately acknowledged Morton's decision to decline appointment as minister to England.

October 21

Troubled by problems related to the surveying of Chickasaw lands, Ulysses S. Grant called Cox and Ely S. Parker, commissioner of Indian Affairs, to the White House.

October 29

Ulysses S. Grant commissioned Columbus Delano as secretary of the interior, effective November 1.

November 11-13

Ulysses S. Grant and Horace Porter visited Philadelphia for the weekend.

November 24

Ulysses S. Grant and family attended Thanksgiving services.

December 5

Ulysses S. Grant submitted his annual message to Congress.

December 9

Secretary of State Hamilton Fish informed the cabinet of an overture from Great Britain to settle the Alabama Claims and other issues.

December 10

Ulysses S. Grant invited Horace Greeley to dinner. On Jan. 3, Ulysses S. Grant and Greeley met at length.

December 12

On Ulysses S. Grant's behalf, U.S. Senator Oliver P. Morton of Ind. and U.S. Representative Nathaniel P. Banks of Mass, introduced a joint resolution to send a commission to investigate Santo Domingo.

December 21

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Robert C. Schenck as minister to Great Britain.

In an evening speech, Ulysses S. Grant opposed moving the national capital to the midwest.

December 28

Ulysses S. Grant's father Jesse Root Grant visited the White House.

January 1

Ulysses S. Grant attended the funeral of Carita Belknap, wife of Secretary of War William W Belknap.

January 5

A delegation from Ore. urged Ulysses S. Grant to appoint George H. Williams to the cabinet.

January 9

Fish and British envoy Sir John Rose began to negotiate a framework for settling the Alabama Claims.

January 13

Ulysses S. Grant appointed members of the Santo Domingo Commission. On Jan. 24, the commission arrived at Santo Domingo.

January 19

James Longstreet, surveyor of customs, New Orleans, discussed La. political affairs with Ulysses S. Grant.

January 25

Ulysses S. Grant attended the unveiling of Vinnie Ream's statue of Abraham Lincoln at the Capitol rotunda.

January 28

Frederick Dent Grant testified before a House subcommittee investigating cadet misconduct at USMA.

January 30

Ulysses S. Grant asked Congress to consider a proposed constitution adopted in Dec, 1870, for a self-governing Indian Territory.

February 2

Ulysses S. Grant held a state dinner for the diplomatic corps.

February 7

Adolph E. Borie and his wife arrived for a week as Ulysses S. Grant's guests.

February 9

Ulysses S. Grant submitted nominations to the Senate for a joint U.S. - British commission to meet at Washington, D.C., to settle the Alabama Claims.

February 15

Ulysses S. Grant protested but did not veto a bill easing restrictions on office-holding for former Confederates.

February 21

Ulysses S. Grant signed legislation creating a D.C. territorial government. On Feb. 27, Ulysses S. Grant nominated Henry D. Cooke as D.C. governor.

February 22

A delegation of Irish exiles met Ulysses S. Grant.

February 27

The Joint High Commission on the Alabama Claims held its first meeting.

March 2

Ulysses S. Grant welcomed the first Japanese legation to the U.S.

March 3

Congress passed legislation for a centennial celebration at Philadelphia in 1876.

March 9

Ulysses S. Grant held a state dinner for the Joint High Commission.

March 10

Ulysses S. Grant congratulated Prussian minister Baron Gerolt on the unification of Germany. On March 16, Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Emperor William I.

March 17

While the weekend guest of Anthony J. Drexel at Philadelphia, Ulysses S. Grant attended a Hibernian Society dinner.

March 23

After outbreaks of violence in many southern states, Ulysses S. Grant asked Congress to strengthen executive power.

March 24

Ulysses S. Grant issued a proclamation ordering armed bands in S.C. to disperse within 20 days.

March 30

Members of the Santo Domingo Commission dined at the White House. Ulysses S. Grant's failure to invite Frederick Douglass provoked controversy. On April 5, Ulysses S. Grant submitted the commission's report to Congress.

April 5

Ulysses S. Grant sent to the Senate a report recommending the annexation of Hawaii.

April 20

Ulysses S. Grant called a special session of Congress for May 10 to consider a possible treaty with Great Britain, still under negotiation. In the evening, Ulysses S. Grant left for the midwest.

April 22

Ulysses S. Grant spoke to an evening rally at Indianapolis.

April 23-25

In St. Louis to inspect his property, Ulysses S. Grant visited friends.

April 26

Ulysses S. Grant and Vice President Schuyler Colfax attended an Odd Fellows meeting at Lafayette, Ind.

April 28

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C.

April 29

Ulysses S. Grant hosted a state dinner for foreign ministers.

May 3

Ulysses S. Grant proclaimed the "Ku Klux" act, passed on April 20 by Congress to enforce the Fourteenth Amendment against violent resistance.

May 6-7

Ulysses S. Grant joined Julia Dent Grant and their son Jesse as weekend guests of Jay Cooke, near Philadelphia.

May 8

U.S. and British commissioners signed the Treaty of Washington, establishing a tribunal at Geneva to arbitrate disputes. On

May 10

Ulysses S. Grant submitted the treaty to the Senate.

May 13

Ulysses S. Grant ordered troops to assist federal officials in arresting suspected Ku Klux Klan members in S.C.

May 22

Colfax collapsed in the Senate and remained at the Capitol, where Ulysses S. Grant visited him on May 24 and 27. On May 31, Colfax left for South Bend, Ind.

May 24

The Senate ratified the Treaty of Washington, which Ulysses S. Grant signed the following day.

May 26

A Washington, D.C, newspaper reported that Ulysses S. Grant had bought a former parsonage for $7,500.

May 27

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Grant, and Ellen (Nellie) Grant visited the Naval Academy at Annapolis.

May 30

Ulysses S. Grant attended Decoration Day ceremonies at Arlington National Cemetery.

June 1

Ulysses S. Grant designated George W Curtis to head a commission to study civil service reforms.

Ulysses S. Grant and family left for their summer home at Long Branch.

June 3

Ulysses S. Grant and Nellie Grant went to New York City to see Ulysses S. Grant's sister Mary Grant Cramer embark for Europe.

June 5

Interviewed at Long Branch, Ulysses S. Grant reflected on his decision to leave the army to run for president.

June 6-13

Ulysses S. Grant and family at West Point. On June 12, Frederick Dent Grant graduated from USMA.

June 15-16

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington, D.C. On June 16, Ulysses S. Grant and cabinet discussed a Korean attack on a U.S. naval and diplomatic expedition.

June 17

The U.S. and Great Britain exchanged ratifications of the Treaty of Washington at London. On July 4, Ulysses S. Grant published the treaty.

June 22

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Dent Grant were guests of Abel R. and Virginia Grant Corbin (Ulysses S. Grant's sister) at Elizabeth, N.J.

June 27

Ulysses S. Grant attended commencement at Princeton.

June 28-29

Ulysses S. Grant and Frederick Grant at Washington, D.C. On June 29, Ulysses S. Grant held a cabinet meeting.

July 6

U.S. Senator Roscoe Conkling of N.Y. visited Ulysses S. Grant at Long Branch.

July 13

Ulysses S. Grant accepted the resignation of Ely S. Parker, commissioner of Indian Affairs.

July 14

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the military to intervene in hostilities between settlers and Apaches.

July 17

Ulysses S. Grant and family toured Fort Hamilton in New York harbor.

July 19

Ulysses S. Grant visited Staatsburg, N.Y., on the Hudson River.

July 27

Ulysses S. Grant went to Philadelphia to see Frederick Grant depart for a civil engineering position in the West.

July 30

Ulysses S. Grant investigated rumors of diseased horses on his St. Louis farm.

August 1-2

At Washington, D.C., Ulysses S. Grant met the German, Dutch, and Italian ministers.

August 4

Ulysses S. Grant asked Vice President Schuyler Colfax to replace Secretary of State Hamilton Fish, who wished to resign.

August 8

During a brief visit to Washington, DC, Ulysses S. Grant appointed Charles Francis Adams as U.S. arbitrator to the Geneva tribunal, and suspended Alfred Pleasonton, commissioner of Internal Revenue.

August 10

Fish and his wife Julia visited Ulysses S. Grant at Long Branch.

August 26

Gen. William T. Sherman visited Ulysses S. Grant at Long Branch.

August 31-September 1

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington, D.C.

September 12-17

Ulysses S. Grant and family toured Pa. and visited the oil regions.

September 18-22

After spending two days in Cincinnati, Ulysses S. Grant visited relatives in Brown and Clermont counties, Ohio.

September 23

Ulysses S. Grant visited his father Jesse Root Grant at Covington, Ky.

September 26

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to Leavenworth, Kan., for the opening of the Chicago and Southwestern Railroad.

September 28-29

Ulysses S. Grant at Galena.

September 30

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Chicago and stayed with his brother Orvil Grant. On Oct. 2, Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant held separate receptions at a Chicago hotel.

October 3

Ulysses S. Grant visited a home for disabled soldiers at Dayton.

October 4-5

Ulysses S. Grant at Pittsburgh.

October 6

Ulysses S. Grant attended the Maryland Agricultural Fair at Frederick, then returned to Washington, D.C.

October 9

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Lt. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to aid Chicago fire victims. On Oct. 11, Ulysses S. Grant donated clothes to the relief effort.

October 12

Ulysses S. Grant warned armed bands in S.C. to disperse within five days. On Oct. 17, Ulysses S. Grant suspended habeas corpus in several S.C. counties.

October 13-16

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant at Boston. On Oct. 16, Ulysses S. Grant attended the opening of the new post office.

October 17—21

Ulysses S. Grant toured Maine and spoke at ceremonies opening the European and North American Railway.

October 22

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant returned to Washington, D.C.

November 4

Ulysses S. Grant refused to close federal offices for November 7 elections.

November 6

Ulysses S. Grant promised to support federal officials in Utah Territory who had indicted Mormon leaders.

November 10-12

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant spent a weekend in New York City with Frederick Grant, who sailed for Europe on November 17.

November 15

In a letter he never mailed, Ulysses S. Grant labeled U.S. Senator Charles Sumner of Mass, "unreasonable, cowardly, slanderous, unblushing false."

November 16

Ulysses S. Grant borrowed $6000 from Adolph E. Borie.

November 20

Yielding to political pressure, Ulysses S. Grant accepted the resignation of Thomas Murphy, collector of customs, New York City. On Dec. 6, Ulysses S. Grant nominated Chester A. Arthur to replace Murphy.

November 23

Ulysses S. Grant met Russian Grand Duke Alexis amid heated controversy over Russian minister Constantin Catacazy.

November 30

Ulysses S. Grant and family attended Thanksgiving services.

December 4

Ulysses S. Grant submitted his annual message to Congress.

December 13

Attorney Gen. Amos T. Akerman resigned at Ulysses S. Grant's request. The next day Ulysses S. Grant nominated George H. Williams to replace Akerman.

December 15

The Alabama Claims tribunal first met at Geneva.

December 19

Ulysses S. Grant submitted the report of the Civil Service Commission to Congress, and promised to adopt changes by Jan. 1, 1872.

December 20

Jesse Root Grant suffered a temporary attack of paralysis at Covington, Ky.

December 20

Ulysses S. Grant reported to the House on conditions in Cuba.

January 4

Ulysses S. Grant ordered an investigation of political turmoil in La.

January 4-7

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited Philadelphia as weekend guests of Borie.

January 10

Ulysses S. Grant met black leaders to discuss pending civil right legislation.

January 12

Ulysses S. Grant refused to intervene directly in La. affairs.

Orvil Grant visited Ulysses S. Grant.

January 15

George and Harriet Pullman arrived for a week as White House guests. Adolph and Elizabeth Borie returned to Philadelphia after a week's visit.

January 20

Ulysses S. Grant met Cherokee, Creek, and Choctaw leaders.

January 23

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Grant, and cabinet members attended the wedding of Secretary of the Navy George M. Robeson and Mary Aulick.

January 26

George W. and Emma Childs returned to Philadelphia after staying at the White House.

January 31

As executor of the John A. Rawlins estate, Ulysses S. Grant gave instructions after Mary E. Rawlins remarried on Jan. 29.

February 3

Ulysses S. Grant and Vice President Schuyler Colfax visited Baltimore to attend an orphan asylum fair.

February 4

Ulysses S. Grant expressed anger at his brother Orvil L. Grant's alleged influence over the collector of customs at Chicago.

February 22

Ulysses S. Grant attended a Philadelphia reception for John W. Forney, recently resigned as collector of customs.

February 23

Ulysses S. Grant and cabinet interviewed Charles Francis Adams, U.S. arbitrator on the Alabama Claims tribunal at Geneva.

March 1

Ulysses S. Grant discussed Mormon troubles with James B. McKean, chief justice, Utah Territory.

Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill creating Yellowstone National Park.

March 2

Ulysses S. Grant met C. F. Daniels, who recently had married John A, Rawlins's widow.

March 4

Ulysses S. Grant welcomed a Japanese delegation sent to negotiate a treaty with the U.S.

March 6

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield concerning Brig. Gen. Oliver O. Howard's authority as "commissioner to study the present condition of Indian affairs in Arizona."

March 7

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Dent Grant, and Ellen Grant left for Philadelphia, to attend the wedding of Anthony J. Drexel's daughter, returning March 11.

March 13

Ulysses S. Grant appointed a commission to study possible canal routes across Central America.

March 14

Ulysses S. Grant met a delegation of Chippewas from Mich, and later hosted a dinner for the Japanese delegation.

March 21

Ulysses S. Grant received a Cherokee delegation.

March 28

Ulysses S. Grant discussed with a Tex. delegation Indian raids launched from Mexico.

April 2-4

Ulysses S. Grant visited New York City to see his daughter Ellen depart for Europe.

April 16

Ulysses S. Grant issued new civil service rules as recommended by an advisory board.

April 17

Ulysses S. Grant told a delegation of black Methodists that he hoped they would soon enjoy all rights of citizenship.

April 19

Ulysses S. Grant recalled Daniel E. Sickles, minister to Spain.

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to the House of Representatives concerning Ku Klux Klan violence in S.C.

April 27

On his birthday, Ulysses S. Grant objected to a New York Herald article attacking Secretary of State Hamilton Fish.

April 30

Ulysses S. Grant welcomed Russian minister Baron d'Offenberg, who replaced Constantin de Catacazy, recalled at U.S. request.

May 1-3

The Liberal Republican party convened at Cincinnati and nominated Horace Greeley for president.

May 11

Ulysses S. Grant issued a proclamation reaffirming the eight hour day for federal laborers, workmen, and mechanics.

May 14

Ulysses S. Grant requested legislation to protect immigrants during and after their passage to the US.

May 18

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant left for a weekend at Elkton, Md., as guests of Postmaster Gen. John A. J. Creswell.

May 21

Ulysses S. Grant appointed a commission to investigate raids into Tex, from Mexico.

May 22

Ulysses S. Grant sent to the Senate a proposal for a U.S. naval station in the Samoan Islands.

May 28

Ulysses S. Grant asked Red Cloud and other visiting Oglala Sioux to consider relocating to the Indian Territory.

May 31

U.S. Senator Charles Sumner of Mass, attacked Ulysses S. Grant in a lengthy speech on the Senate floor.

June 1

Ulysses S. Grant proclaimed the removal of most political disabilities imposed by the Fourteenth Amendment.

June 4

The Senate ordered the printing of its report on alleged fraud in the New York City Customhouse. Investigation, begun in Jan., elicited testimony from several men close to Ulysses S. Grant, including his secretaries Horace Porter (Mar. 4) and Orville E. Babcock (Mar. 6).

June 6

The Republican party convention in Philadelphia unanimously nominated Ulysses S. Grant for a second term. U.S. Senator Henry Wilson of Mass, secured nomination for vice president.

June 10

Ulysses S. Grant formally accepted his re-nomination.

Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill appropriating $10,000 for a statue of John A. Rawlins.

June 11

Ulysses S. Grant and family left for their summer home at Long Branch.

June 18-20

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington, D.C.

June 24-28

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited Boston. On June 26, Ulysses S. Grant received an honorary degree from Harvard. Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant attended a musical jubilee featuring Johann Strauss as conductor.

July 2-4

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington, D.C. On July 3, Ulysses S. Grant met an Apache delegation and ordered Howard to inspect Indians in New Mexico Territory.

July 6

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited New York City to see their son Ulysses S. Grant, Jr., depart for Europe.

July 9

The Democratic Party convened at Baltimore and nominated Greeley.

July 16

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Fish expressing hope for a trade treaty with Japan, despite difficult negotiations. Talks ended July 22.

July 24

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the seizure at Newport, R.I., of the Pioneer, engaged in supplying Cuban insurgents.

July 28

Ulysses S. Grant wrote privately to Gerrit Smith concerning the merits of pardoning prisoners convicted of Ku Klux Klan activities, During 1873, Ulysses S. Grant pardoned many of these prisoners.

July 29—August 10

Ulysses S. Grant and family toured upstate N.Y., visiting U.S. Senator Roscoe Conkling of N.Y. at Utica, and the St. Lawrence River summer home of George M. Pullman.

August 16

At Washington, D.C, Ulysses S. Grant received the new minister from Nicaragua.

August 26

Ulysses S. Grant predicted privately that Greeley would not carry a single northern state.

August 28-29

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington, D.C.

September 7

In a private letter, Ulysses S. Grant promised to ask Jesse Root Grant to resign as postmaster, Covington, Ky.

September 11-12

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington, D.C.

September 14

The tribunal at Geneva awarded the U.S. $15:5 million for damages caused by the Alabama and other C.S. raiders

September 19-20

Ulysses S. Grant attended the NJ. State Fair and visited an industrial exhibition at Newark.

September 26

Ulysses S. Grant and Porter attended a reception given by Philadelphia merchants.

September 27

Ulysses S. Grant and family returned to Washington, D.C.

October 8

Early elections presaged Republican victory in November

October 10. William H. Seward died.

October 20-23

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant traveled to New York City. On Oct. 22, Ellen Grant returned from England.

November 4

Ulysses S. Grant won election to a second term, carrying 31 of 37 states.

November 8-12

Ulysses S. Grant at Philadelphia. On

November 11

Ulysses S. Grant attended the funeral of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, who had died November 6.

November 15

Ulysses S. Grant told a Pa. delegation that he would follow civil service rules in nominating the Philadelphia postmaster.

November 26

Ulysses S. Grant told a delegation of Philadelphia blacks that he supported the idea of equal rights for all citizens.

November 29

Greeley died.

December 1

Porter resigned as Ulysses S. Grant's secretary.

December 2

Ulysses S. Grant submitted his fourth annual message to Congress.

December 3

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Ward Hunt to succeed Samuel Nelson as U.S. Supreme Court justice.

December 4

Ulysses S. Grant attended Greeley's funeral in New York City.

December 10-11

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Grant, and Ellen Grant visited Philadelphia for the wedding of Emily Borie.

December 12

The House of Representatives began to investigate the Credit Mobilier scandal.

December 20-24

Ulysses S. Grant and son Jesse visited Jesse Root Grant at Covington, Ky.

January 5

Ulysses S. Grant advised the U.S. Army commander not to take sides in a dispute over the legitimate La. government.

January 10

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Dent Grant, and Ellen Grant attended the Midshipman's Ball at Annapolis, Md.

January 13

Ulysses S. Grant met a Cherokee delegation.

January 31

Ulysses S. Grant signed legislation to abolish the franking privilege.

February 6

Ulysses S. Grant attended a veterans' meeting at Wilmington, Del.

February 12

Ulysses S. Grant signed the Coinage Act, demonetizing silver.

February 14

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Congress concerning jurisdictional conflict between federal and local courts in Utah Territory.

Congress authorized Ulysses S. Grant to appoint commissioners to the international exposition at Vienna.

February 18

The House of Representatives ordered the printing of its report on the Credit Mobilier scandal.

February 19

A delegation of blacks urged Ulysses S. Grant to grant belligerent rights to Cuban rebels.

February 20

Ulysses S. Grant attended an orphan asylum fair in Baltimore.

February 25

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Congress that he would support the Republican government in La. unless Congress legislated otherwise.

March 3

Ulysses S. Grant signed the controversial "salary grab" act that doubled his own pay to $50,000 and increased that of other federal officials.

March 4

Ulysses S. Grant was inaugurated for a second term. Henry Wilson was inaugurated as vice president. Ulysses S. Grant invited former Vice President Schuyler Colfax to dinner at the White House.

March 5

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the army to protect the Republican government in La.

March 6

Levi P. Luckey was appointed private secretary to Ulysses S. Grant.

March 12

Ulysses S. Grant supported his old army friend and former C.S. gen. Lafayette McLaws in a factional dispute among Ga. Republicans.

March 13

Ulysses S. Grant and Orville E. Babcock visited Philadelphia.

March 17

Ulysses S. Grant nominated his cabinet, naming William A. Richardson as secretary of the treasury in place of George S. Boutwell, elected U.S. Senator from Mass.

April 1

Ulysses S. Grant and family visited New York City.

April 11

During peace talks in Calif., Modocs under Captain Jack killed Brig. Gen. Edward R. S. Canby.

April 16

Ulysses S. Grant and family left Washington, D.C., on a western trip.

April 18-23

Visiting St. Louis, Ulysses S. Grant said that he probably would not settle there after his presidency.

April 24-May 1

Ulysses S. Grant and party continued west, via Kansas City, to Denver and nearby Idaho Springs, returning through Omaha.

May 2-3

During a stop in Galena, Ulysses S. Grant said that he probably would not settle there after his presidency.

May 4-7

Ulysses S. Grant visited his brother Orvil L. Grant in Chicago. On

May 7

Ulysses S. Grant spoke to the Board of Trade about the city's recovery from the 1871 fire.

May 8

Ulysses S. Grant and family left Chicago for Washington, D.C.

May 12

Ulysses S. Grant and cabinet attended the funeral of Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase, who had died on May 7.

May 15

Ulysses S. Grant attended an Army of the Potomac reunion in New Haven, Conn.

May 19

Wilson suffered a stroke from which he never fully recovered.

May 22

Ulysses S. Grant proclaimed his intention to use force to restore order in La.

May 26-29

Ulysses S. Grant and Babcock visited Harrisburg, Pa.

June 2

U.S. troops captured Captain Jack and other Modoc holdouts.

June 6

Ulysses S. Grant and family left Washington, D.C, for their summer home at Long Branch.

June 10-12

Ulysses S. Grant attended USMA graduation.

June 19-20

Ulysses S. Grant at Washington, D.C.

June 29

Jesse Root Grant, aged 79, died while Ulysses S. Grant was en route to Covington, Ky. On July 1, Ulysses S. Grant attended the funeral.

July 3

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Long Branch. Ulysses S. Grant announced dates for the 1876 centennial exhibition.

July 7

Ulysses S. Grant wrote privately of his astonishment on learning of his daughter Ellen's romance with Algernon Sartoris.

July 28-31

Ulysses S. Grant and Babcock visited Kingston, N.Y.

August 6-7

At Washington, D.C., Ulysses S. Grant talked to cabinet officers.

August 11-21

Ulysses S. Grant and party visited Maine, N.H., Vt, and N.Y.

August 22

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary.

September 10

Ulysses S. Grant secretly commuted the sentences of two condemned Modocs to life imprisonment, to be announced Oct. 3.

September 15-16

Ulysses S. Grant visited Philadelphia, where he enrolled his son Jesse at school and attended a 25th anniversary dinner for the Aztec Club of Mexican War officers.

September 17

Ulysses S. Grant attended the Army of the Cumberland reunion at Pittsburgh.

September 19

The failure of Jay Cooke & Co. precipitated a crisis on Wall Street. vv

September 20-21

Ulysses S. Grant consulted bankers and government officials in New York City about the financial panic.

September 22

Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Washington, D.C., for more talks on the panic.

September 23

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Long Branch.

September 26

Ulysses S. Grant and family resumed residence at the White House.

September 27

Ulysses S. Grant urged bankers to support business with loans and to help restore public confidence.

October 1

Ulysses S. Grant attended the fair at Carroll County, Md.

October 3

Captain Jack and three other Modocs were executed.

October 6

Ulysses S. Grant ordered rations sent to Memphis during a yellow fever epidemic.

October 9

Ulysses S. Grant attended the Md. agricultural fair.

October 14

Ulysses S. Grant received a delegation of the Evangelical Alliance, a Protestant advocacy group.

October 15-16

Ulysses S. Grant attended an Army of the Tennessee reunion at Toledo.

October 24

Ulysses S. Grant received delegations of Crow and Ute Indians at the White House.

Ulysses S. Grant's longtime friend and business manager Charles W. Ford died at Chicago. Ford and Ulysses S. Grant had met the previous week in Toledo.

November 6

Ulysses S. Grant and cabinet attended the Loudon County, Va., fair.

November 7

Spanish authorities in Cuba executed the American captain and 36 crew and passengers of the Virginius, captured on Oct. 31 off Cuba while flying the U.S. flag. Four others had been shot on November 4; the total eventually reached 53.

November 14

Ulysses S. Grant met Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians.

November 16

Ulysses S. Grant attended church with his mother in Elizabeth, N.J.

November 29

The U.S. and Spain agreed on measures to settle the Virginius affair.

Va. Republican John S. Mosby, former C.S. partisan commander, called on Ulysses S. Grant to offer his services in the event of war with Spain.

December 1

Ulysses S. Grant submitted his annual message to Congress. Ulysses S. Grant nominated Attorney Gen. George H. Williams as chief justice and Benjamin H. Bristow as attorney gen.; both nominations were later withdrawn.

December 3

Ulysses S. Grant met a Quaker delegation.

December 12

Ulysses S. Grant addressed a delegation from the National Colored Convention.

December 15

Ulysses S. Grant's father-in-law, Frederick F. Dent, aged 87, died at the White House. Ulysses S. Grant, Frederick Dent Grant, and Babcock escorted the body to St. Louis for the funeral on Dec. 20.

December 23

Ulysses S. Grant and party returned to Washington, D.C.

January 12

Ulysses S. Grant refused to send troops to Tex., where defeated Republicans balked at conceding power.

January 13

Ulysses S. Grant withdrew the nomination of Caleb Cushing as chief justice, U.S. Supreme Court.

January 19

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Morrison R. Waite as chief justice.

January 29

Ulysses S. Grant met delegates from the National Education Association.

February 13

Ulysses S. Grant purchased a lot in Washington, D.C., reportedly to build a house for his retirement.

February 25

Ulysses S. Grant challenged Congress to either fund the Centennial celebration in Philadelphia or "suppress it in its infancy."

February 27

Ulysses S. Grant read to his cabinet a draft veto of pending legislation to expand the currency.

March 3

Ulysses S. Grant pardoned three Buffalo men convicted of registering Susan B. Anthony and other women to vote in 1872.

March 13

Ulysses S. Grant attended the funeral of Charles Sumner, who had died two days earlier.

March 24

Ulysses S. Grant attended the funeral of his brother-in-law Lewis Dent, who died March 22 in Washington, D.C.

March 27

An Osage delegation met Ulysses S. Grant at the White House. Ulysses S. Grant rebuked visitors from an S.C. taxpayers' convention, where a speaker had attacked him. "I have never seen a speech equal to it in malignity, vileness, falsity, and slander. When I think of it, I can scarcely restrain myself."

April 3

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to New York City.

April 18

Ulysses S. Grant recommended that Congress continue funding the Civil Service Commission and ordered U.S. troops in Ark. To protect telegraph lines in a dispute between two gubernatorial contenders.

April 22

Overcoming his own qualms and a divided cabinet, Ulysses S. Grant vetoed the controversial Legal Tender Act to expand paper currency, citing fears of inflation. Ulysses S. Grant instead advocated specie resumption, or the redemption of greenbacks in coin.

April 23

Ulysses S. Grant signed legislation to aid victims of spring flooding along the Mississippi River.

May 7

Elihu B. Washburne, minister to France, declined consideration for secretary of the treasury.

May 15

Ulysses S. Grant proclaimed Elisha Baxter as Ark. governor, over Joseph Brooks.

May 21

Ellen Grant married Algernon Sartoris at the White House.

May 22-23

Ulysses S. Grant and family visited New York City, where the newlyweds embarked for England.

June 1

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Benjamin H. Bristow as secretary of the treasury, replacing William A. Richardson.

June 2

Ulysses S. Grant laid the cornerstone for the Museum of Natural History in New York City.

June 3

Mandan and Arikara chiefs visited the White House.

June 13-15

Ulysses S. Grant and party spent the weekend at Cape May, NJ.

June 18

Ulysses S. Grant sent a treaty regulating trade with Canada to the Senate, which declined to act.

June 20

Ulysses S. Grant signed a compromise currency bill intended to better distribute the nation's money supply.

June 22

Ulysses S. Grant approved legislation creating a commission to study levees and flood protection on the lower Mississippi River.

June 23

Congress adjourned.

June 24

Postmaster Gen. John A. J. Creswell resigned, the last member of Ulysses S. Grant's original cabinet.

June 25-30

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Dent Grant toured West Va., stopping in White Sulphur Springs and Charleston.

July 1

The first typewriter went on sale in the U.S., priced at $125.

July 2

Ulysses S. Grant designated Marshall Jewell, minister to Russia, to succeed Creswell as postmaster gen.

July 3

Ulysses S. Grant selected a commission to study navigation at the mouth of the Mississippi River.

July 4

Ulysses S. Grant and family arrived at their Long Branch summer home.

The Eads Bridge opened at St. Louis.

July 12

William S. Hillyer, Ulysses S. Grant's friend and wartime aide, died in Washington, D.C.

July 13

Ulysses S. Grant interceded on behalf of the Western Union Telegraph Co. in a dispute with the Justice Dept. Ulysses S. Grant and party traveled to Saratoga Springs, N.Y, to attend weeklong regatta festivities.

July 14

Ulysses S. Grant and Orville E. Babcock watched a Yale-Harvard baseball game at Saratoga Springs.

July 15

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant attended a camp meeting at Round Lake, N.Y

July 22

Ulysses S. Grant attended a Grand Army of the Republic reunion at Paterson, N.J.

July 25-27

Ulysses S. Grant and party visited Atlantic City, N.J.

August 26

Ulysses S. Grant and party left New York City for Newport, R.I., aboard the City of Peking.

August 27-31

Ulysses S. Grant and party attended a Methodist camp meeting at Martha's Vineyard, Mass., and visited Cape Cod and Nantucket.

September 2

Ulysses S. Grant wrote that "recent atrocities" in southern states showed a disregard for law "that ought not to be tolerated in any civilized government." On September 3, Attorney Gen. George H. Williams ordered federal officials in southern states to protect lives and civil rights.

September 5

Blacks in La., citing persecution, petitioned Ulysses S. Grant for resettlement in a new territory or in Africa.

September 12

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C.

September 14

Ulysses S. Grant entertained fellow members of the Aztec Club, composed of officers from the Mexican War. In New Orleans, armed "White Leaguers," challenging Governor William P. Kellogg, battled state and city militia.

September 15

Forgoing plans to return to Long Branch, Ulysses S. Grant issued a proclamation ordering lawless elements in La. to disperse.

September 17

Ulysses S. Grant ordered U.S. troops and naval vessels to New Orleans.

September 22

Secretary of State Hamilton Fish submitted his resignation, which he later withdrew upon Ulysses S. Grant's urging.

September 25

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant moved back into the White House, which had undergone summer repairs.

September 27-30

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited New York City.

October 1

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant attended the Washington wedding of Minnie Sherman (daughter of Gen. William T. Sherman) and Thomas W Fitch, a navy engineering officer.

October 3

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant, Adolph E. and Elizabeth M. Borie, and Babcock left the capital for the west.

October 5-10

At St. Louis, Ulysses S. Grant and party attended an agricultural fair. A local paper protested that a blue ribbon awarded to Ulysses S. Grant's horse "was given as a compliment to the President and not to the animal."

October 11-12

Touring the Indian Territory by train, Ulysses S. Grant greeted gatherings of Cherokees, Choctaws, and Creeks.

October 14-15

Ulysses S. Grant attended an Army of the Tennessee reunion at Springfield, Ill. On Oct. 15, at the dedication of a monument to Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant praised Lincoln's magnanimity in the face of "obloquy, personal abuse and hate undisguised," and his tendency "to find excuses for his adversaries."

October 20

At Chicago, Ulysses S. Grant attended the wedding of Frederick Dent Grant and Ida M. Honore.

October 24

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C.

November 3

Republicans lost control of the House of Representatives at midterm elections.

November 18

The Women's Christian Temperance Union organized in Cleveland.

November 21

Ulysses S. Grant attended a Baltimore lecture on George Washington.

November 25

The Greenback party formed in Indianapolis.

December 7

In his annual message to Congress, Ulysses S. Grant reiterated his support for specie resumption. John McDonald, St. Louis revenue supervisor, accompanied Ulysses S. Grant on a carriage ride.

December 9

Ulysses S. Grant declined a request for U.S. troops to intervene in La.

December 10

A Navajo delegation visited the White House.

December 13

Under the pseudonym "Sylph," Babcock telegraphed to McDonald concerning a plan to send treasury agents to investigate St. Louis whiskey frauds. "I succeeded. They will not go."

December 18

Ulysses S. Grant welcomed King Kalakaua of Hawaii to the White House.

December 21

Responding to violence at Vicksburg, Ulysses S. Grant ordered lawless elements to disperse.

December 22

Ulysses S. Grant hosted a state dinner for King Kalakaua.

December 24

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Lt. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to New Orleans to investigate unrest in La. and Miss.

January 4

U.S. troops evicted Democrats from the state house in New Orleans during a dispute over the composition of the legislature.

January 5

In New Orleans, Lt. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan compared "White League" opponents of Republican Governor William P. Kellogg to "banditti."

January 7

An anonymous Virginian sent Ulysses S. Grant a death threat, the first of many prompted by events in La.

January 13

In a lengthy message to the Senate, Ulysses S. Grant defended his policy in La., where, he argued, "the spirit of hatred and violence is stronger than law."

January 14

Ulysses S. Grant signed a currency bill that committed the U.S. to replace all greenbacks with coin by 1879.

January 27

Ulysses S. Grant's daughter Ellen Sartoris arrived in New York City from England. School superintendents thanked Ulysses S. Grant for supporting public education.

February 1

Ulysses S. Grant sent to the Senate a reciprocity treaty with Hawaii, ratified on March 18.

February 4

Ulysses S. Grant revoked a Jan. 27 order to transfer revenue supervisors aimed at uncovering collusion between officials and distillers to produce non-taxed whiskey.

February 8

Without consulting the cabinet, Ulysses S. Grant condemned the new Ark. constitution and asked Congress to act.

February 10

Ulysses S. Grant approved legislation to aid sufferers from drought and grasshoppers in Kan. and Neb.

February 23

Ulysses S. Grant greeted Mexican War veterans.

March 1

Ulysses S. Grant signed the Civil Rights Act guaranteeing blacks access to public facilities and the right to serve on juries.

March 3

Faced with Ulysses S. Grant's veto, Congress adjourned without passing a controversial bill to equalize bounty payments for veterans.

March 9

Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill appropriating $505,000 for executive branch exhibits at the Centennial celebration in Philadelphia.

March 17

Amid gold rush rumors, Ulysses S. Grant reported efforts to prevent mining parties from exploring Sioux land in the Black Hills.

March 26

Ulysses S. Grant and cabinet rejected Fitz John Porter's appeal for a review of his wartime court-martial.

March 28

In Neb., Red Cloud resolved to see Ulysses S. Grant about the Black Hills. "Look at me! I am no Dog. I am a man. This is my ground, and I am sitting on it."

April 15-21

Ulysses S. Grant and cabinet traveled to Mass, for the centennial of the revolutionary war battles at Lexington and Concord.

April 22

Attorney Gen. George H. Williams resigned because of reports of financial irregularities involving his wife.

April 24

Yale paleontologist Othniel C. Marsh conveyed to Ulysses S. Grant Red Cloud's allegations of fraud in the distribution of rations.

May 10

Treasury officials raided distilleries in Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Louis, seizing evidence of whiskey frauds.

May 19

Ulysses S. Grant greeted Red Cloud, Spotted Tail, and other Sioux leaders delegated to discuss the status of the Black Hills.

May 26

Ulysses S. Grant warned the Sioux that whites would eventually overrun their land and advised them to resettle in the Indian Territory.

May 27

Ulysses S. Grant greeted a papal delegation.

May 29

Ulysses S. Grant ended fervid speculation by announcing that he would not accept a third term unless compelled by "imperitive duty."

June 2

Ulysses S. Grant urged the Sioux to relinquish hunting rights in Neb. And to allow mining concessions in the Black Hills.

June 15

From his summer home at Long Branch, Ulysses S. Grant ordered the navy to patrol the Rio Grande and to stop raids from Mexico.

June 18

Ulysses S. Grant toured the Centennial buildings and grounds in Philadelphia.

June 20

Ulysses S. Grant asked Secretary of the Interior Columbus Delano to resign. Delano reportedly threatened blackmail to forestall removal.

July 9

Secretary of State Hamilton Fish visited Ulysses S. Grant at Long Branch.

July 11

Ulysses S. Grant's first grandchild, Grant Sartoris, was born at Long Branch.

July 21

At the capital, Ulysses S. Grant and cabinet discussed Cuban unrest and the D.C. district attorneyship.

July 24

Ulysses S. Grant attended the funeral of George Templeton Strong in New York City.

July 29

Ulysses S. Grant met the Board of Indian Commissioners at Long Branch. On a letter detailing whiskey fraud investigations at St. Louis, Ulysses S. Grant wrote "Let no guilty man escape," destined to be a watchword for the scandal.

July 31

Andrew Johnson died in Tenn.

August 10

In Neb., U.S. commissioners and Sioux chiefs discussed fraud at the Red Cloud Agency.

August 15-19

Ulysses S. Grant visited Fairpoint and Buffalo, N.Y., then spent three days in R.I. as the guest of U.S. Senator Ambrose E. Burnside.

August 31

Ulysses S. Grant and family traveled to New York City, where the Sartorises departed for England.

September 1

Secretary of the Treasury Benjamin H. Bristow submitted his resignation amid press reports of his feud with Delano. Bristow remained in the cabinet.

September 13

Weighing a September 8 request for troops to quell Miss, unrest, Ulysses S. Grant acknowledged the public's impatience with such appeals but promised firmness if necessary. Ultimately, no troops were sent.

September 15-16

Ulysses S. Grant attended the Army of the Cumberland reunion at Utica, N.Y

September 17

Ulysses S. Grant saw the play 'Around the World in Eighty Days" at the Academy of Music in New York City.

September 20-29

At a Neb. council, U.S. commissioners could not convince the Sioux to renegotiate the 1868 Black Hills treaty.

September 21

Ulysses S. Grant and Frederick Dent Grant attended the N.J. state fair.

September 22

Delano visited Ulysses S. Grant at Elizabeth, N.J., and successfully pressed for acceptance of his resignation. Ulysses S. Grant and party left for St. Louis.

September 24

At Ulysses S. Grant's behest, Fish and cabinet met after Ulysses S. Grant had passed Columbus, Ohio, to consider Delano's replacement as secretary of the interior.

September 26

At St. Louis, Ulysses S. Grant arranged to liquidate his farm assets and prepared to lease the property.

September 29

Addressing an Army of the Tennessee reunion in Des Moines, Ulysses S. Grant championed non-sectarian public education.

September 30

A livestock auction at Ulysses S. Grant's farm yielded poor returns.

October 1

Ulysses S. Grant spoke to high school students at Omaha.

October 2-4

Ulysses S. Grant traveled to Cheyenne and to Salt Lake City, where he met Brigham Young.

October 5-9

Ulysses S. Grant visited Denver and other points in Colorado Territory.

October 15

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, D.C. The cabinet discussed the pending election in Miss.

October 19

Ulysses S. Grant chose Zachariah Chandler as secretary of the interior, ending weeks of awkward uncertainty.

November 1

Ulysses S. Grant told local clergymen that he would not abandon his peace policy toward the Indians.

November 2

Republicans gained ground in state and local elections.

November 3

Ulysses S. Grant met key officials on Indian policy and decided to allow miners entry into the Black Hills.

November 8-11

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited New York City.

November 22

A St. Louis jury found John McDonald, revenue supervisor, guilty in the whiskey frauds.

Vice President Henry Wilson died.

December 3

Ulysses S. Grant authorized a military trial for Orville E. Babcock, tied by prosecutors to whiskey frauds in St. Louis.

December 7

In his annual message, Ulysses S. Grant proposed a constitutional amendment "to establish and forever maintain free public schools adequate to the education of all the children in the rudimentary branches."

December 8

Ulysses S. Grant summoned Solicitor of the Treasury Bluford Wilson for a tense exchange about whiskey fraud investigations.

December 9

A grand jury in St. Louis formally indicted Babcock for conspiracy in the whiskey frauds. On Dec. 15, Babcock's military court disbanded.

December 17-18

Ulysses S. Grant and a large congressional delegation visited the Centennial grounds in Philadelphia.

January 2

Ulysses S. Grant sought to sell shares of Chicago railroad stock to pay debts.

January 7

In a cabinet meeting, Ulysses S. Grant condemned published reports that falsely connected his brother, Orvil L. Grant, and son, Frederick Dent Grant, to the Whiskey Ring.

January 8

Ulysses S. Grant told a rally of Union veterans that he would "find a place for any of your comrades that may be discharged from the Capitol," as the new House of Representatives Democratic majority rewarded supporters with patronage jobs.

January 26

At Ulysses S. Grant's urging, Attorney Gen. Edwards Pierrepont discouraged U.S. attorneys from granting immunity for testimony in Whiskey Ring cases.

February 8

Cabinet members convinced Ulysses S. Grant not to testify in St. Louis on behalf of his private secretary Orville E. Babcock, an alleged Whiskey Ring conspirator. Instead, on Feb. 12, Ulysses S. Grant gave a deposition that helped acquit Babcock.

February 14

Ulysses S. Grant complained privately that Secretary of the Treasury Benjamin H. Bristow "had become possessed with the idea of the complicity of the President" in the Whiskey Ring.

February 16

Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill appropriating $1,500,000 to complete Centennial buildings in Philadelphia.

February 27

Ulysses S. Grant received evidence implicating Babcock in the 1869 "Black Friday" gold scandal.

February 28

Ulysses S. Grant urged Congress to fund emergency provisions for the Red Cloud Agency, declaring that delay "will cause great distress and be likely to provoke raids on white settlements, and possibly lead to a general outbreak of hostilities."

March 2

Secretary of War William W Belknap resigned to avoid impeachment over alleged payments from post traders. March 3. Displacing Babcock, Ulysses S. Grant appointed Ulysses S. Grant, Jr., as his private secretary, "some one whom he could absolutely trust to open letters."

March 6

Ulysses S. Grant learned of possible frauds involving Secretary of the Navy George M. Robeson.

March 7

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Alphonso Taft to replace Belknap. Ulysses S. Grant told the cabinet that he believed in Belknap's innocence.

March 9

Orvil Grant testified before a congressional committee on his role in distributing post-trader ships.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered the military to suppress border incursions along the Rio Grande in Tex.

March 17

Troops under Brig. Gen. George Crook attacked Crazy Horse's camp on the Little Powder River, Montana Territory.

March 21

Ulysses S. Grant said that a future interoceanic canal should be neutral, "made free to the use of all powers and built by the funds of all who may be willing to unite."

March 27

In United States v. Cruikshank, the Supreme Court weakened civil rights enforcement in a case stemming from an 1873 massacre of blacks in Colfax, La.

April 3

The House of Representatives voted five articles of impeachment against Belknap. The Senate later acquitted him on all charges.

April 6

Ulysses S. Grant issued orders reestablishing army hd. qrs. at Washington, D.C., and clarifying the chain of command.

April 14

Ulysses S. Grant unveiled the Freedmen's Memorial Monument to Abraham Lincoln in Washington, D.C.

April 18

Ulysses S. Grant vetoed a bill to reduce the president's salary from $50,000 to $25,000.

April 22

Ulysses S. Grant inspected Centennial facilities in Philadelphia.

April 28

Ulysses S. Grant relieved Lt. Col. George A. Custer from command of an upcoming expedition against the Sioux, but later allowed him to join under Brig. Gen. Alfred H. Terry.

May 4

In answer to a congressional resolution, Ulysses S. Grant defended his absences from the capital.

May 10

Ulysses S. Grant opened the Centennial Exhibition and toured exhibits with Emperor Pedro II of Brazil.

May 21

Ulysses S. Grant's grandson Grant Sartoris died in England.

May 22

Reshaping his cabinet, Ulysses S. Grant nominated Pierrepont as minister to Great Britain, Taft to succeed Pierrepont, and James D. Cameron to replace Taft.

May 25

Ulysses S. Grant urged Americans to prepare local histories as part of Centennial observances.

May 25

Ulysses S. Grant ordered limited protection for miners and others trespassing in the Black Hills.

June 6

Ulysses S. Grant encouraged Sunday school children to "Hold fast to the Bible as the sheet-anchor of your liberties."

June 7

Ulysses S. Grant's granddaughter Julia Grant was born at the White House.

June 9

Ulysses S. Grant attended the consecration of Adas Israel synagogue in Washington, D.C.

June 14

Ulysses S. Grant postponed efforts to change a treaty governing Chinese immigration.

June 15

At the College of Notre Dame of Maryland in Baltimore, Ulysses S. Grant conferred diplomas on graduates, including niece Bessie Sharp.

June 16

At Cincinnati, Republicans nominated Governor Rutherford B. Hayes of Ohio for president.

June 17

Crook's troops battled Sioux and Cheyenne along Rosebud Creek, Montana Territory.

Ulysses S. Grant urged Congress to pass stalled appropriations bills.

June 21

Ulysses S. Grant nominated Lot M. Morrill as secretary of the treasury to replace Bristow, who had resigned on June 17.

June 23-25

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Dent Grant, and Gen. William T Sherman spent the weekend in Harrisburg, Pa., as guests of Cameron.

June 25

Sioux and Cheyenne overwhelmed Custer's command at the Little Big Horn River, Montana Territory. News reached the capital on July 6.

June 26

Ulysses S. Grant asked the nation to observe the Fourth of July with "some public religious and devout thanksgiving."

June 29

At St. Louis, Democrats nominated Governor Samuel J. Tilden of N.Y. for president.

June 30

Ulysses S. Grant signed the first of several bills extending appropriations for ten days to meet expenditures.

July 4

A bill to open homestead lands for public sale in five southern states became law without Ulysses S. Grant's signature.

July 8

In Hamburg, S.C., whites attacked a black militia co. and summarily executed five. On July 26, Ulysses S. Grant condemned the "barbarous massacre of innocent men."

July 11

Ulysses S. Grant nominated James N. Tyner as postmaster gen. in place of Marshall Jewell, who resigned because Ulysses S. Grant "could stand his annoyance no longer."

July 12

Ulysses S. Grant released Bristow "from all obligation of secrecy" after he had cited executive privilege before a committee investigating whiskey frauds.

July 14-17

Ulysses S. Grant visited the Deer Park Hotel in western Md., a resort operated by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

August 1

Colo, became the thirty-eighth state.

August 2

Ulysses S. Grant approved $200,000 over four years to construct the Washington Monument.

August 14

Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill to improve rivers and harbors but told Congress "Under no circumstances will I allow expenditures upon works not clearly National."

August 19

Ulysses S. Grant and family left the White House for Long Branch.

September 1

In an interview, Ulysses S. Grant blamed Custer for the "sacrifice of troops" at Little Big Horn.

September 9

Troops attacked a Sioux camp at Slim Buttes, Dakota Territory.

September 20-23

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited Philadelphia friends and toured the Centennial grounds.

September 26-28

In Ithaca, N.Y., Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited their son Jesse, ajunior at Cornell University.

September 30

Ulysses S. Grant greeted a black marching club in Washington, Pa.

October 6

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant returned to the White House.

October 7

Ulysses S. Grant ordered that William M. "Boss" Tweed, recaptured in Spain after escaping from a New York City jail, be delivered to N.Y authorities.

October 12

In New York City, Ulysses S. Grant told Secretary of State Hamilton Fish he had "great confidence" in Hayes's election.

October 17

Citing diplomatic protocol, Ulysses S. Grant refused to accept a Centennial address carried by Irish nationalists Charles Stewart Parnell and John O'Connor Power.

Ulysses S. Grant ordered S.C. "rifle clubs"—armed whites organized to intimidate blacks—to disperse within three days.

October 18

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at an Army of the Tennessee reunion in Washington, D.C., where a statue of James B. McPherson was unveiled.

October 31

Ulysses S. Grant welcomed the Nicaraguan minister, who spoke of his country's desire to expedite canal treaty talks.

November 7

Democrat Samuel J. Tilden won the popular vote for president over Republican Rutherford B. Hayes.

November 10

At Philadelphia, Ulysses S. Grant declared the Centennial closed. Amid growing uncertainty over electoral totals, Ulysses S. Grant directed troop movements and requested that Republican leaders witness vote counts at New Orleans.

November 11

Ulysses S. Grant ordered Lt. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to New Orleans "to keep the peace and to protect the legal Canvassing board in the performance of its duties."

November 13

Ulysses S. Grant requested that Republican leaders witness vote counts in Fla. and S.C.

November 14

John S. Mosby warned Ulysses S. Grant of possible assassination.

December 3

Ulysses S. Grant ordered U.S. troops not to interfere in a dispute over rival legislatures in S.C. To U.S. Representative Abram S. Hewitt of N.Y, Democratic national chairman, Ulysses S. Grant confidentially acknowledged Republican defeat in La.

December 5

Ulysses S. Grant's eighth and final annual message opened with a candid assessment of his presidency.

December 6

Ulysses S. Grant gave Hewitt "a piece of his mind" concerning Democratic tactics, especially in S.C. Presidential electors cast their ballots, giving Tilden 184 to Hayes 165, with 20 still disputed (Fla., La., Ore., and S.C).

December 23

Ulysses S. Grant ordered troops to Miss. He also announced the resumption of extradition to and from Great Britain after a protracted treaty dispute.

January 1

In La., Republicans and Democrats set up rival governments.

January 9

La. Democrats ousted Republican-appointed justices.

January 14

Ulysses S. Grant declared that he would not "sit quietly by" and allow La. Democrats to seize power "gradually" and "by illegal means."

January 17

Ulysses S. Grant told Secretary of State Hamilton Fish that the Fifteenth Amendment "was a mistake; that it had done the negro no good."

January 19

Ulysses S. Grant ordered troops to assist revenue officials facing armed resistance from illicit distillers in N.C., S.C., and Ga.

January 26

Ulysses S. Grant pardoned John McDonald, leader of the St. Louis Whiskey Ring.

January 27

Ulysses S. Grant told Fish that the La. dispute "had given him a great deal of anxiety and trouble."

January 29

Ulysses S. Grant signed an act creating an electoral commission to resolve disputed vote counts in contested states.

February 1

Ulysses S. Grant stopped criminal proceedings against former Secretary of War William W Belknap

February 3

Ulysses S. Grant urged Congress to hasten specie resumption.

February 5

Ulysses S. Grant countermanded an order to withdraw troops from the capital.

February 9

Hayes won the Fla. electoral vote.

February 16

Hayes won the La. electoral vote.

February 20

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Hayes that his election was "virtually determined" and invited him to stay at the White House before the inauguration.

February 23

Hayes won the Ore. electoral vote.

February 26

Republicans and Democrats reportedly met at Wormley's Hotel in Washington, D.C., to discuss a compromise settlement to the electoral crisis.

February 27

Hayes won the S.C. electoral vote.

February 28

Ulysses S. Grant signed into law an agreement by which the Sioux ceded rights to the Black Hills.

March 1

Ulysses S. Grant declined to support the Republican contender for La. governor, citing public opposition.

March 2

At 4:10 A.M., the Senate certified Hayes as president. Hours later, Hayes arrived in the capital and met Ulysses S. Grant.

March 3

On the advice of Ulysses S. Grant and Fish, Hayes was quietly sworn in as president prior to a White House dinner.

March 5

Hayes was formally inaugurated. Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Dent Grant left the White House for Fish's home, where they stayed for nearly three weeks.

March 7-8

Ulysses S. Grant conferred with senators amid rumors that he sought to defeat the nomination of Carl Schurz as secretary of the interior.

March 17

Ulysses S. Grant's grandson Algernon Edward Sartoris was born.

March 24—April 23

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited family and friends in Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago, Galena, and Pa. At Cincinnati, Ulysses S. Grant said "I don't suppose I will have any political opponents now, since we are all sovereigns together."

April 2

"There are books enough already," Ulysses S. Grant told a St. Louis reporter who asked whether he planned to write his memoirs. In the same interview, Ulysses S. Grant supported Hayes's Southern policy but distanced himself from civil service reform.

April 24

U.S. troops left New Orleans, ending federal occupation of the South.

April 28—May 9

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited relatives and friends in Elizabeth, Newark, and Morristown, N.J.

May 6

Pursued since the Battle of Little Big Horn, Crazy Horse surrendered.

May 9-16

At Philadelphia, Ulysses S. Grant attended the opening of a permanent Centennial exhibition and was mustered into George G. Meade Post No. 1, Grand Army of the Republic.

May 17

Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Grant, and son Jesse sailed for Liverpool aboard the Indiana.

May 28

Enthusiastic crowds welcomed Ulysses S. Grant and party to Liverpool.

May 30—31

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Manchester and Leicester, en route to London.

June 8

Ulysses S. Grant attended an agricultural exhibition at Bath.

June 18

Ulysses S. Grant breakfasted with Matthew Arnold, Robert Browning, and Anthony Trollope. He told a Reform Club dinner that he was "overwhelmed by the kindness" shown to him in England.

June 23

Ulysses S. Grant dined with the Prince of Wales.

June 26

Ulysses S. Grant and party dined with Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle, where they spent the night.

June 28

Ulysses S. Grant told a Liverpool audience" We are of one kindred, one blood, one language, and one civilization."

July 3

To a delegation of British workers, Ulysses S. Grant saluted "the labourer who is the author of all greatness and wealth."

July 5

From Folkestone, Ulysses S. Grant and party crossed the English Channel to Ostend, Belgium.

July 6-8

At Brussels, Ulysses S. Grant met King Leopold of Belgium.

July 9-17

In Germany, Ulysses S. Grant stopped at Cologne, Frankfort-am- Main, and Heidelberg, where he met Richard Wagner.

July 18—31

In Switzerland, Ulysses S. Grant and party visited Lucerne, Interlaken, Bern, and Geneva.

August

The Grants toured northern Italian lakes. At Lake Maggiore, Ulysses S. Grant said "There is one Italian whose hand I wish especially to shake, and that man is General Garibaldi."

August 25

From London, Ulysses S. Grant inquired about his mining stock, writing that his future travels "will have to depend in some degree upon the length of time it continues to pay dividends."

August 29

En route to Edinburgh, during a lengthy interview with a New Tork Herald reporter, Ulysses S. Grant disparaged Charles Sumner.

August 30-September 20

Touring Scotland, Ulysses S. Grant received many civic honors. At Glasgow, he commented "I find that I am being made so much a citizen of Scotland that it will become a serious question where I shall go to vote."

September 21-29

The Grants toured England, from Newcastle to Leamington. Ulysses S. Grant tired of public ceremonies. "I would rather be kicked—in a friendly way—than to make these replies." At Stratford upon Avon, he received an address "in a Casket made out of Shakespeare's Mulberry Tree."

October 1-8

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited their daughter, Ellen Grant Sartoris, at Warsash, the Sartoris family home. On Oct. 6, Ulysses S. Grant toured nearby Southampton.

October 8-15

At Torquay, Ulysses S. Grant, Julia Grant, and daughter Ellen were guests of Alfred D. Jessup.

October 16-17

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Birmingham, where he met Joseph Chamberlain.

October 18

Wendell Phillips defended Sumner in the wake of Ulysses S. Grant's interview. On Oct. 20, Fish rebutted Phillips.

October 24-November 30

At Paris, Ulysses S. Grant met President Maurice de MacMahon, sat for painter George P. A. Healy, and viewed the construction of the Statue of Liberty. He wrote "I have seen nothing here that would make me want to live in Paris."

December 1

Ulysses S. Grant and party left Paris for Nice, by way of Lyons and Marseilles.

December 13-January 5

The U.S.S. Vandalia carried Ulysses S. Grant and party from Nice to Alexandria, Egypt. Stops included Genoa; Naples, where Ulysses S. Grant toured Mount Vesuvius and Pompeii; and Palermo, where the party celebrated Christmas.

January 5-8

At Alexandria, Ulysses S. Grant met Henry M. Stanley.

January 9

At Cairo, Ulysses S. Grant met the khedive.

January 16-February 3

Ulysses S. Grant and party explored the Nile by steamer, visiting ruins at Thebes and Memphis.

February 9

Ulysses S. Grant boarded the Vandalia at Port Said.

February 11 - 17

Ulysses S. Grant and party braved bad roads and weather to tour the Holy Land. At Jerusalem "it rained, blew and snowed all the time."

February 22

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Smyrna, Turkey.

March 1-6

At Constantinople, Sultan Abdul Hamid II presented Ulysses S. Grant with two Arabian stallions.

March 8-15

Ulysses S. Grant visited Athens, "one of the most beautiful, cleanest and best paved cities in Europe," inhabited by "a very energetic and advancing people."

March 18

The Vandalia arrived at Naples.

March 21—April 14

In Rome, Ulysses S. Grant visited the studios of American artists and met Pope Leo XIII.

April 15-21

At Florence, Ulysses S. Grant toured the Uffizi Gallery.

April 22- May 7

Ulysses S. Grant visited Venice, Milan, Turin, and Dijon, before returning to Paris.

May 11

Ulysses S. Grant toured the Paris Universal Exposition. "It is quite a success, but, I think, no improvement on our Centennial show. The buildings and grounds are far inferior to ours."

May 27

The New Tork Herald published an interview in which Ulysses S. Grant countered criticism of his Va. campaign by Gideon Welles and former C.S.A. Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor.

June 14

The Grants left Paris for The Hague, Rotterdam, and Amsterdam. Ulysses S. Grant called Holland "the most interesting country— and people—that I have yet seen."

June 26- July 2

At Berlin, Ulysses S. Grant met Chancellor Otto von Bismarck and reviewed Prussian military units.

July 4

Near Hamburg, Ulysses S. Grant told an Independence Day gathering of Americans "The humblest soldier who carried a musket is entitled to as much credit for the results of the war as those who were in command."

July 6-12

At Copenhagen, the guest of brother-in-law Michael John Cramer, US. charge d'affaires, Ulysses S. Grant discounted a presidential run in 1880: "I have had all the honors, and would like to avoid the vexations of political life for the future."

July 13-29

Ulysses S. Grant toured Scandinavia.

July 24

The New Tork Herald published a lengthy interview with Ulysses S. Grant, who assessed Union and Confederate commanders, described the Appomattox campaign, and defended his Santo Domingo policy.

July 30- August 14

Ulysses S. Grant visited St. Petersburg and Moscow. A conversation with Tsar Alexander II focused on Indian policy.

August 18-22

The Grant party reached Vienna by way of Warsaw. Ulysses S. Grant met Emperor Francis Joseph I.

August-September

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant toured the Alps. Ulysses S. Grant met Emperor William I of Germany at a spa near Salzburg.

September 23

At Zurich, Ulysses S. Grant attended a dinner in his honor.

September 25

John Russell Young and others greeted Ulysses S. Grant on his return to Paris.

October 3

In Paris, Ulysses S. Grant attended a dinner at the US. legation.

October 12

Ulysses S. Grant and party left Paris for Bordeaux.

October 15—16

At Vitoria, Spain, Ulysses S. Grant observed army maneuvers with King Alfonso XII.

October 18—23

Ulysses S. Grant toured Madrid museums and the nearby Escorial.

October 24

Ulysses S. Grant visited a sword factory and synagogue in Toledo.

October 27-November 1

At Lisbon.

November 3-12

Back in Spain, Ulysses S. Grant visited Cordova, Seville, and Cadiz.

November 12-18

At Gibraltar, Ulysses S. Grant dined with the governor, Lord Napier, joined a fox hunt, and reviewed British troops.

November 19-23

Ulysses S. Grant and party visited Granada and Malaga.

December 6-11

At Pau, France, Ulysses S. Grant attended dinners and a fox hunt, then returned to Paris on Dec. 12.

January 3

At Dublin, when Ulysses S. Grant was made an honorary citizen he noted that as president he had represented "more Irishmen and their descendants" than Queen Victoria.

January 6—8

At Londonderry and Belfast, nationalists protested Ulysses S. Grant's alleged snub of an Irish delegation in 1876.

January 21

Ulysses S. Grant left Paris for Marseilles with a party that included his son Frederick, Adolph E. Borie, and John Russell Young.

January 23

The Grant party sailed from Marseilles aboard a French steamer bound for Alexandria, Egypt.

January 30

From Alexandria, Ulysses S. Grant traveled overland to Suez and boarded a British steamer for Bombay.

February 13—18

At Bombay, Ulysses S. Grant was feted by his British hosts, met local Parsees, toured schools and the jewelry district, and attended horse races.

February 19—20

While visiting Jabalpur, Ulysses S. Grant rode an elephant to a nearby quarry. "Was much pleased with the intelligence of these animals."

February 23

After a stop at Allahabad, Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Agra and visited the Taj Mahal.

February 25

Ulysses S. Grant witnessed ritual animal sacrifice in an ancient palace at Ulwar.

March 1—4

Ulysses S. Grant saw ancient ruins, tombs, and deserted villages near Delhi, then toured positions of the 1857 siege with a British survivor.

March 8

Ulysses S. Grant observed Hindu pilgrims in the holy city of Benares.

March 10-16

While at Calcutta, Ulysses S. Grant dined with Viceroy Edward Robert Bulwer-Lytton.

March 19—22

Ulysses S. Grant visited Rangoon and the golden pagoda of Shwedagon.

March 29

At Penang, Chinese merchants asked Ulysses S. Grant to oppose legislation restricting Chinese immigration to the U.S.

April 1—9

Ulysses S. Grant and party visited Singapore after stopping at Malacca.

April 7

Vivien May Sartoris, granddaughter, born.

April 13-18

At Bangkok, Ulysses S. Grant held talks with King Chulalongkorn.

April 25—26

Ulysses S. Grant and party toured Saigon.

April 30

At Hong Kong, Ulysses S. Grant visited his friend and former C.S.A. partisan ranger John S. Mosby.

May 6

Ulysses S. Grant visited the Chinese viceroy at Canton, after a procession witnessed by 200,000.

May 12

Ulysses S. Grant and party departed Hong Kong for Amoy.

May 17-23

At Shanghai, Ulysses S. Grant attended a ball and a torchlight parade and addressed U.S. Civil War veterans.

May 27—31

Ulysses S. Grant befriended Viceroy Li Hung-chang at Tientsin.

June 3—10

At Peking, "this forsaken city," Ulysses S. Grant and party visited the Great Wall and the Temple of Heaven, which Ulysses S. Grant deemed "not worth the trouble of a visit."

June 5—8

During talks with Prince Kung, Ulysses S. Grant agreed to mediate a dispute between China and Japan over the Ryukyu Islands.

June 12—14

Ulysses S. Grant held talks with Li Hung-chang at Tientsin.

June 15

Ulysses S. Grant and party boarded the U.S.S. Richmond off Tientsin.

June 21—27

While at Nagasaki, Japan, Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant planted a banyan tree in a park.

June 28—July 2

With travel hindered by a cholera outbreak, Ulysses S. Grant toured Japan's inland sea aboard the Richmond.

July 3

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Tokyo after landing at nearby Yokohama.

July 4

Ulysses S. Grant met the Emperor and Empress and celebrated Independence Day with American residents.

July 7

Ulysses S. Grant reviewed Japanese troops with Emperor Meiji.

July 8

Tokyo honored Ulysses S. Grant with an evening lantern procession.

July 9

Ulysses S. Grant attended a dinner at Yokohama.

July 10

Ulysses S. Grant visited a Tokyo normal school and attended a university commencement.

July 16

Ulysses S. Grant attended a Kabuki play staged in his honor at Tokyo's Shintomiza Theater. Ulysses S. Grant wrote "The Japanese are altogether the superior people of the East."

July 19—28

Ulysses S. Grant visited Nikko and toured local shrines and scenic spots.

August 4

Back in Tokyo, Ulysses S. Grant learned that Japanese reactionaries had threatened to assassinate him and others.

August 7

Ulysses S. Grant telegraphed his willingness to lead a proposed Nicaragua canal project.

August 10

In an audience with Emperor Meiji, Ulysses S. Grant denounced the treatment of Asiatic nations by the Western powers.

August 12—19

Ulysses S. Grant visited the hot springs at Hakone.

August 13

In a letter to both parties, Ulysses S. Grant proposed a conference to settle the Ryukyu dispute.

August 16

U.S. newspapers published a false rumor that Nellie Grant Sartoris had died.

August 20—September 2

In Tokyo, Ulysses S. Grant visited a military school and the race track, attended a festival at Uyeno Park, and bade farewell to Emperor Meiji.

September 3

Ulysses S. Grant and party departed on the City of Tokio.

September 20

Ulysses S. Grant arrived at San Francisco to a tumultuous welcome.

September 25

Ulysses S. Grant addressed veterans of both armies at Oakland.

September 27

Ulysses S. Grant saw HMS Pinafore at San Francisco's California Theatre. Later, he attended a veterans' campfire.

September 29

Ulysses S. Grant told thousands of children that only schools "can insure the permanency and perpetuity of our institutions."

October 1—6

Ulysses S. Grant and party toured Yosemite Valley by stagecoach and visited the giant sequoias.

October 8

U.S. Senator William Sharon of Nev. hosted a dinner for Ulysses S. Grant and 2,000 guests at Belmont, his Calif, estate.

October 13

At Astoria, Ore., Ulysses S. Grant recalled his first visit in 1852. On the same day, at Vancouver, Washington , Ulysses S. Grant noted "I lived a year on the spot on which I now stand."

October 14

En route from Vancouver to Portland, Ore., Ulysses S. Grant's steamer briefly ran aground. Ulysses S. Grant teased his wife "Julia, you ought to be satisfied now, we've gone to the bottom at last."

October 15

At Portland, Ulysses S. Grant toured public schools and took a Columbia River excursion.

October 16

Ulysses S. Grant visited Salem, Ore.

October 22—23

At Sacramento, Ulysses S. Grant toured public schools and gave a lengthy interview about China and Japan.

October 25

Ulysses S. Grant left San Francisco.

October 27—29

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Virginia City, Carson City, and Reno, Nev. Deep inside the Virginia Consolidated Mine, Ulysses S. Grant joked about leaving reporters and politicians there, "but there ain't room for all that ought to be put here."

October 30

Before a speech at Ogden, Utah Territory, Ulysses S. Grant said he had grown accustomed to public speaking during his travels. "I think I am improving, for my knees don't knock together like they did at first."

October 31

After stops in Wyoming Territory, Ulysses S. Grant entertained veterans aboard his train.

November 1

Ulysses S. Grant noted rapid growth in Neb., with towns "as thick as blackberries."

November 3—4

Crossing Iowa, Ulysses S. Grant addressed a veterans' banquet at Council Bluffs and spoke at the Burlington high school.

November 5—11

At Galena, Ulysses S. Grant said "I can take my quiet and ease here better than any-where else."

November 12

Chicago greeted Ulysses S. Grant with a massive parade. Watching from his hotel balcony, Ulysses S. Grant met Samuel L. Clemens.

November 13

Ulysses S. Grant told a Society of the Army of the Tennessee reunion "Avoid quarreling among ourselves, and we need have no fear for the future."

November 22

Ulysses S. Grant visited Platteville, Wis.

November 29

The Grants hosted a reception for Galena friends.

December 1

Ulysses S. Grant visited friends at Dubuque.

December 4—8

At Chicago, Ulysses S. Grant met clergy at the home of Frederick Dent Grant and planted an elm tree in South Park.

December 9

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Logansport, Ind., and at Indianapolis.

December 10

At Louisville, Ulysses S. Grant's reception "astonished" him.

December 11

Ulysses S. Grant addressed a large crowd at Cincinnati's Music Hall.

December 12

Ulysses S. Grant spoke to soldiers' orphans at Xenia, Ohio, and addressed a banquet at Columbus.

December 13—14

At Pittsburgh, Ulysses S. Grant addressed business and civic leaders at several appearances.

December 15

Ulysses S. Grant spoke before the governor's mansion in Harrisburg.

December 16

Completing his tour around the world, Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Philadelphia and reviewed a large parade in his honor.

December 24

Ulysses S. Grant visited his mother and sister at Jersey City.

December 26

At Philadelphia, Ulysses S. Grant addressed the Universal Peace Union and privately met President Rutherford B. Hayes.

December 27-30

At Washington, D.C., Ulysses S. Grant visited Edward F. Beale.

December 31

Ulysses S. Grant stopped at Columbia, S.C., and Augusta, Ga.


1880s Debt, Illness & Death

January 1

Ulysses S. Grant addressed black militia at Beaufort, S.C.

January 2—3

Ulysses S. Grant spent the night at Savannah before boarding a steamer for Fla.

January 8—14

Ulysses S. Grant and party navigated the St. Johns and Oklawaha rivers.

January 18

From St. Augustine, Ulysses S. Grant wrote "This state has a great future before it."

January 21

At Key West, Ulysses S. Grant said "Cubans, or any other refugees in this country, would always find a free home with us."

January 22—February 13

In Cuba, Ulysses S. Grant and party stayed at the governor's palace, witnessed carnival, and visited a tobacco and sugar plantation and hot springs.

February 5

Borie died at Philadelphia.

February 18

Matias Romero and other Mexican officials welcomed Ulysses S. Grant at Vera Cruz.

February 23

At Mexico City, Ulysses S. Grant and Lt. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan met President Porfirio Diaz.

February 24

Ulysses S. Grant visited Molino del Rey and recounted scenes from them Mexican War.

March 4—8

Ulysses S. Grant visited silver mines north of Mexico City.

March 17

Ulysses S. Grant promised to promote railroad-building in Mexico.

March 19—23

Between Vera Cruz and Galveston, a storm in the Gulf of Mexico delayed the City of Mexico and prompted rumors it had sunk.

March 25

Ulysses S. Grant spoke to black students in Galveston.

March 26—29

Ulysses S. Grant visited San Antonio and Houston.

March 31—April 8

At New Orleans, Ulysses S. Grant addressed the legislature, visited black churches and schools, attended numerous banquets, and was made a duke by the Mardi Gras society.

April 6

Ulysses S. Grant inspected jetties at the mouth of the Mississippi River.

April 9

En route to Mobile, Ulysses S. Grant passed the home of Jefferson Davis in Biloxi, Miss.

April 12

A former Miss. col. welcomed Ulysses S. Grant to Vicksburg.

April 13

At Memphis, Ulysses S. Grant spoke at a downtown rally and a Beale Street church, then visited a black school.

April 15

Ulysses S. Grant visited Little Rock.

April 16

At Cairo, Ulysses S. Grant recalled when "your little city was a camp of bristling bayonets."

April 19

Ulysses S. Grant reached Galena after numerous stops to greet Ill. crowds.

May 5

Ulysses S. Grant addressed a rally at Springfield, Ill.

May 6

Republicans opposed to a third term for Ulysses S. Grant met at St. Louis.

May 26—28

Young visited Ulysses S. Grant at Galena and wrote that "we knocked about the country together like a pair of boys on a holiday."

May 31

Ulysses S. Grant spent the night with friends at Dubuque.

June 2

Republicans convened at Chicago.

June 7

Balloting began at Chicago.

June 8

James A. Garfield was nominated on the thirty-sixth ballot after delegates deadlocked between Ulysses S. Grant and James G. Blaine.

June 9

Ulysses S. Grant stopped briefly at Chicago to thank supporters.

June 10

At Milwaukee, Ulysses S. Grant addressed a national veterans' reunion. Privately, he declared himself "much relieved at the result" in Chicago.

June 14

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Fond du Lac, Wis.

June 17

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant returned to Galena.

June 22

Ulysses S. Grant declined the presidency of the Panama Canal Co.

June 24

At Cincinnati, Democrats nominated Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock for president.

July 1

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Jacksonville, Ill.

July 2

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Merriam, Kan., and Kansas City.

July 3—4

Ulysses S. Grant visited Fort Leavenworth, Kan.

July 7—16

In New Mexico Territory, Ulysses S. Grant toured mines.

July 24

Ulysses S. Grant addressed veterans at Leadville, Colo.

July 31—August 10

Traveling mostly by pack mule, Ulysses S. Grant toured mining camps near Gunnison, Colo.

August 16

At Denver, Ulysses S. Grant rode horseback in a parade to his hotel.

August 21

Ulysses S. Grant attended a banquet at Boulder.

August 23

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory.

August 27

At Galena, Ulysses S. Grant addressed the Garfield and Arthur club.

September 6—8

Ulysses S. Grant attended the Wis. State Fair at Madison.

September 15—16

Ulysses S. Grant attended the Winnebago County Fair at Rockford, Ill.

September 21

Interviewed at Galena, Ulysses S. Grant criticized Hancock's record in postwar La. and called him "a weak, vain man."

September 21

Jesse Root Grant, Jr., married Elizabeth Chapman in San Francisco.

September 28

Ulysses S. Grant addressed a large Republican rally at Warren, Ohio. Later, Ulysses S. Grant, U.S. Senator Roscoe Conkling, and others visited Garfield at nearby Mentor.

October 6-7

Ulysses S. Grant attended a reunion of the 21st Ill. at Decatur.

October 11

N.Y. Republicans honored Ulysses S. Grant with a torchlight parade through Manhattan.

October 12

Republicans carried elections in Ohio and Ind.

October 12—15

Ulysses S. Grant visited Providence, Boston, and Plymouth Rock.

October 16

At Hartford, Samuel L. Clemens praised Ulysses S. Grant's service to the nation.

October 20

Addressing the N.Y. Stock Exchange, Ulysses S. Grant alluded to his last visit, during the 1873 panic.

October 21

Ulysses S. Grant presided over Republican rallies at Stamford, Conn., and Jersey City.

October 23

Ulysses S. Grant testified at a court of inquiry for Lt. Col. Gouverneur K. Warren. Later, he spoke at a rally in Franklin, N.J.

October 25—29

Campaigning in upstate N.Y., Ulysses S. Grant addressed rallies at Utica, Syracuse, Auburn, Rochester, and Buffalo.

October 30

At a Staten Island rally, Ulysses S. Grant closely predicted the election's outcome.

November 1

Ulysses S. Grant, Jr., married Fannie Josephine Chaffee in New York City.

November 2

Garfield defeated Hancock. Ulysses S. Grant wrote "The country, in my judgement has escaped a great calamity."

November 11

Ulysses S. Grant spoke at length about Mexican trade and development to leading railroad promoters assembled by Matias Romero.

November 22

Ulysses S. Grant attended the unveiling of a statue of Alexander Hamilton in Central Park.

December 11

Ulysses S. Grant toured factories at Paterson, N.J.

December 14—16

At Washington, D.C., Ulysses S. Grant addressed a Boys in Blue reception and dined at the White House.

January 11

Ulysses S. Grant visited his mother and sister at Elizabeth, N.J., and addressed a parade of Zouaves.

January 14

Ulysses S. Grant accepted the presidency of the 1883 World's Fair Commission. Later, Ulysses S. Grant addressed a benefit concert for a black church.

January 16

Ulysses S. Grant attended the Saturday Club at the home of Anthony J. Drexel in Philadelphia.

January 17-20

In Albany, Ulysses S. Grant addressed the N.Y. State Assembly.

January 21

Ulysses S. Grant spoke to veterans at Troy, N.Y.

January 22

Horace Porter gave a dinner for Ulysses S. Grant at the Union League Club.

January 31

N.Y. Senator William Waldorf Astor introduced a bill to incorporate the Mexican Southern Railroad.

February 1—3

Ulysses S. Grant attended meetings of the Peabody Education Fund in Washington, D.C.

February 5

Ulysses S. Grant presided over a banquet to raise money for the 1883 World's Fair, and later subscribed $1,000 for 100 shares.

February 11

Ulysses S. Grant chaired a meeting of capitalists interested in Mexican railroad development.

February 26

Ulysses S. Grant urged that the 1883 World's Fair be located in Central Park.

March 9

Visiting Washington, D.C, Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant ate breakfast at the White House with President James A. Garfield.

March 22

Faced with lagging subscriptions and a dispute over the site, Ulysses S. Grant resigned from the 1883 World's Fair Commission.

March 28

Ulysses S. Grant left for Mexico to negotiate a contract for the Mexican Southern Railroad Co.

April 3

At Galveston, the Grants and Matias Romero boarded the steamer Whitney for Vera Cruz.

April 22

Ulysses S. Grant addressed a Mexico City banquet.

April 24

In a letter from Mexico City, Ulysses S. Grant criticized Garfield over N.Y. patronage.

May 11

Ulysses S. Grant signed a contract with Mexican officials granting concessions to the Mexican Southern Railroad Co.

June 2

The Grants arrived at New Orleans aboard the City of Merida. Ulysses S. Grant praised Roscoe Conkling, who had resigned from the Senate to protest President James A. Garfield's patronage policy.

June 6—11

Ulysses S. Grant extended a stop at St. Louis after Julia Grant became ill. Ulysses S. Grant attended horse races and visited his farm.

June 12

Interviewed at Chicago, Ulysses S. Grant escalated his involvement in the Garfield-Conkling dispute.

June 16

Ulysses S. Grant told a Pittsburgh reporter "As a citizen I have a right to express my thoughts and will do so when it suits me."

June 17

Back in New York City Ulysses S. Grant met Conkling.

June 23

Ulysses S. Grant wrote from Long Branch that Julia Grant remained ill.

July 2

Garfield was shot by Charles J. Guiteau.

July 4

Interviewed about Garfield's condition, Ulysses S. Grant recalled his own encounters with Guiteau. "He looked seedy and like a dead-beat."

Ulysses S. Grant 3rd was born at Chicago.

August 2

Ulysses S. Grant wrote that he had purchased a home in New York City.

August 4

Ulysses S. Grant's brother Orvil died at Elizabeth, N.J.

August 5

Nellie Grant, daughter of Jesse Root Grant, Jr., was born at Long Branch.

August 11

Ulysses S. Grant served as pallbearer at the funeral of Robert Patterson in Philadelphia.

September 6

Garfield was moved from the White House to Long Branch. At Chicago, Ulysses S. Grant told a reporter "He should have been taken from there long ago."

September 8

Ulysses S. Grant addressed Ill. veterans at Bloomington.

September 19

Garfield died. Ulysses S. Grant was observed "weeping bitterly."

September 21

With President Chester A. Arthur, Ulysses S. Grant accompanied Garfield's body from Long Branch to Washington, D.C.

September 22

Ulysses S. Grant and Rutherford B. Hayes paid respects to Garfield in the Capitol rotunda.

September 26

Miriam Grant, daughter of Ulysses S. Grant, Jr., was born in New York City.

September 29

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant moved into their new home.

October 21

Ulysses S. Grant visited Washington, D.C.

November 3

Fitz John Porter presented his case for reinstatement to the army to Ulysses S. Grant.

December 22

Reversing his previous stance, Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Arthur favoring Fitz John Porter's cause.

March 8

Unfounded rumors of Ulysses S. Grant's failure sparked a run on Wall Street.

March 21-28

At Washington, D.C, Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant attended a White House dinner and Arthur's first public reception.

April 25

Ulysses S. Grant attended the wedding of John Russell Young to Julia E. Coleman at Hartford.

May 4

Arthur declined to reinstate Fitz John Porter.

June 13—15

Ulysses S. Grant attended the Army of the Potomac reunion at Detroit.

June 24

The Grants arrived at Long Branch.

June 29

Ulysses S. Grant survived a train derailment near Long Branch that left three dead.

July 6

Ulysses S. Grant signed but later disavowed a letter concerning the Grant & Ward brokerage firm that authorized Ferdinand Ward to "derive what profit he can for the firm that the use of my name and influence may bring."

August 7

Arthur commissioned Ulysses S. Grant to negotiate a commercial treaty with Mexico.

August 21—28

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant vacationed at Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

September 20

The Grants left their summer home at Long Branch.

October 6

Ulysses S. Grant signed a contract to extend the Mexican Southern Railroad into Guatemala.

October 10

Ulysses S. Grant asked Edwin D. Morgan for a $30,000 loan.

October 11

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant began a visit to the country home of George W. Childs, near Philadelphia.

November 7

Democrats won a majority in the House of Representatives.

November 8

Ulysses S. Grant visited a Boston industrial fair.

November 22

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Arthur urging currency expansion.

November 25

Ulysses S. Grant attended a Saturday Club meeting at the Philadelphia home of Anthony J. Drexel.

December 19

Ulysses S. Grant hosted a dinner at the Union League Club for Prince Arisugawa Taruhito of Japan.

December 22

Ulysses S. Grant and Samuel L. Clemens addressed the New England Society dinner.

January 2-24

In Washington, D.C., Ulysses S. Grant negotiated the Mexican treaty, concluded on Jan. 20.

February 13

Ulysses S. Grant testified about the Mexican treaty before a Senate committee.

February 16

Ulysses S. Grant served as pallbearer at Edwin D. Morgan's funeral.

April 3

Ulysses S. Grant was elected president of the National Rifle Association.

April 4

Ulysses S. Grant hosted a dinner for Porfirio Diaz at the Union League Club.

May 1

Ulysses S. Grant attended a baseball game at the Polo Grounds, where New York defeated Boston 7—5.

May 11

Hannah Simpson Grant died at Elizabeth, N.J.

May 14

Ulysses S. Grant buried his mother beside his father in Cincinnati.

May 24—June 2

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited Chicago, Galena, and St. Louis.

June 3

At Louisville, Ulysses S. Grant said "I have washed my hands of politics."

June 4—6

Illness to Julia Grant between Louisville and New York City forced a stop at Washington, D.C.

June 9-12

Ulysses S. Grant visited West Point.

June 21

At Jersey City, Ulysses S. Grant presented diplomas to graduates of Hasbrouck Institute, including his niece, Clara V. Cramer.

August 1—3

The Grants journeyed to the Catskill Mountains.

August 4

Ulysses S. Grant attended a clam bake at Monmouth, N.J.

August 17

From Deer Park, Md., Ulysses S. Grant and Edward F. Beale visited the Elk Garden mines in West Va.

August 18

Ulysses S. Grant returned to Long Branch.

August 30—September 21

Ulysses S. Grant accompanied an excursion to celebrate the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad in Montana Territory. Stops included Chicago, Minneapolis, and Portland, Ore.

September 28

Chaffee Grant, son of Ulysses, Jr., was born.

September 29—October 1

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant visited Frederick Dent Grant at Morristown, N.J.

November 15-18

En route to Buffalo and Rochester, N.Y., Ulysses S. Grant toured the Pa. oil region and inspected the Kinzua railroad viaduct near Bradford, Pa.

November 26

Ulysses S. Grant participated in ceremonies marking the centennial of the British evacuation of New York City.

November 27

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant attended the wedding of Mae E. Drexel in Philadelphia.

December 24

When Ulysses S. Grant slipped on ice in front of his home he injured his left leg.

January 18

The Senate rejected the Mexican treaty.

January 21

Ulysses S. Grant reported himself "still a great sufferer, confined to my room."

March 6

Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Grant left for Old Point Comfort, Va., where Ulysses S. Grant received physical therapy.

March 8

Fort Monroe fired a salute on Ulysses S. Grant's arrival.

March 17-April 11

At Washington, D.C., Ulysses S. Grant met Arthur and attended several veterans' gatherings.

April 12

The Grants returned to New York City.

May 4

Hoping to prevent the failure of Grant & Ward, Ulysses S. Grant borrowed $150,000 from William H. Vanderbilt.

May 6

Grant & Ward and the associated Marine National Bank both failed.

May 7

Ulysses S. Grant told Vanderbilt that he would liquidate his and Julia Grant's assets to pay back the $150,000. Ward admitted to Grant, Jr., "that he had been a wicked thief and a great rascal." Senator George F Edmunds of Vt. introduced a bill to retire Ulysses S. Grant as gen. on full pay.

May 8

Grant & Ward's assets were assigned to creditors.

May 9

Grant, Jr., told a reporter "The Grant family has lost its entire fortune; the ruin is complete."

May 21

Ward was arrested.

May 26

James D. Fish, Marine Bank president was arrested.

May 30

Ulysses S. Grant observed Memorial Day in Brooklyn.

June 6

In Chicago, Republicans nominated James G. Blaine and John A. Logan to head the fall ticket.

June 11

Ulysses S. Grant addressed an Army of the Potomac reunion in Brooklyn.

June 23

From Long Branch, Ulysses S. Grant thanked Matias Romero for financial assistance.

June 30

Ulysses S. Grant submitted an article on Shiloh to the Century Magazine and received $500. By September 10, Ulysses S. Grant had written similar articles on Vicksburg, Chattanooga, and the Wilderness campaign.

July 2

Arthur vetoed a bill to reinstate Fitz John Porter.

July 19

Ulysses S. Grant declined to attend the Army of the Tennessee reunion, writing that he was still on crutches.

August 2

At Ocean Grove, N.J., Ulysses S. Grant addressed a reunion of Christian and Sanitary Commission workers and army chaplains.

August 8

Busy with the Century articles, Ulysses S. Grant wrote that he had decided to compile his Memoirs.

September 5

Ulysses S. Grant's will was witnessed at Long Branch.

September 17

The Grants returned to New York City.

September 19

Ulysses S. Grant met Blaine.

October 9

Ulysses S. Grant testified about trade and consular reform to a visiting commission.

November 4

Grover Cleveland defeated Blaine.

November 18

Ulysses S. Grant wrote of having "a sore throat" for four months.

December 4

U.S. Senator John I. Mitchell of Pa. introduced a bill to grant Ulysses S. Grant a pension. On Dec. 5, Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Mitchell that he would not accept it. On Dec. 8, Mitchell withdrew the bill.

December 16

Ulysses S. Grant wrote "It is nearly impossible for me to swallow enough to sustain life, and what I do swallow is attended with great pain."

January 3

Ulysses S. Grant asked Vanderbilt to "have the property upon which you hold a mortgage sold for what it will bring, and have the amount credited to what I owe you."

January 10

Vanderbilt arranged to present Ulysses S. Grant's mementoes to the U.S. government.

January 12

Phineas T Barnum offered Ulysses S. Grant $100,000 to display the mementoes.

January 13

Schuyler Colfax died in Minn.

January 14

The Senate passed a bill to retire Ulysses S. Grant on full pay as gen.

February 19

Doctors diagnosed Ulysses S. Grant with throat cancer.

February 27

Ulysses S. Grant contracted with Charles L. Webster & Co., controlled by Clemens, to publish his Memoirs.

March 3—4

The House of Representatives passed the retirement bill. Arthur then nominated and the Senate confirmed Ulysses S. Grant as gen., retired.

March 26

Ulysses S. Grant was deposed in Fish's trial.

March 29

Ulysses S. Grant nearly died in a choking fit.

April 3

Ulysses S. Grant wrote to a future president asking the appointment of his grandson, Ulysses S. Grant 3rd, as military academy cadet. On March 30, 1898, President William McKinley approved the request.

April 6

Ulysses S. Grant told his doctors "My chances, I think, of pulling through this are one in a hundred."

April 7

Ulysses S. Grant had another near fatal episode.

April 12

Fish was convicted of bank fraud and sentenced to ten years in prison. On Oct. 29, Ward was convicted of grand larceny and sentenced to ten years at hard labor.

April 15

Julia Dent Grant, daughter of Ulysses, Jr., was born.

April 27

Ulysses S. Grant thanked all who had sent birthday greetings.

May 2

Ulysses S. Grant publicly denied claims that Adam Badeau was the true author of his Memoirs. Privately, Ulysses S. Grant dismissed Badeau from further work on the project.

May 16

In Central Park, Ulysses S. Grant greeted children from a nearby school.

May 23

Ulysses S. Grant dedicated his Memoirs "to the American soldier and sailor."

May 29

Ulysses S. Grant planned the disposition of Memoirs proceeds.

May 30

From his window, Ulysses S. Grant reviewed a Memorial Day parade.

June 16

Ulysses S. Grant and family moved to Mount McGregor, N.Y., to escape New York City heat.

June 18

Ulysses S. Grant and his family were photographed at Mount McGregor.

June 26

Ulysses S. Grant made a brief excursion in a bath chair.

June 29

In a farewell letter to Julia Grant, Ulysses S. Grant asked her to choose his gravesite.

June 29—July 1

Clemens visited Ulysses S. Grant.

July 2

Ulysses S. Grant expressed gratitude that he had been given time to write his Memoirs.

July 8

A delegation of Mexican journalists visited Ulysses S. Grant.

July 10

Simon B. Buckner visited Ulysses S. Grant.

July 16

Ulysses S. Grant wrote of his Memoirs "There is nothing more I should do to it now."

July 20

Ulysses S. Grant wrote his doctor "What do you think of my taking the bath wagon and going down to overlook the south view?"

July 23, 8:00 A.M.

Ulysses S. Grant died at Mount McGregor.